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The U.S. States With The Largest And Smallest Gender Pay Gaps (Actual Equality Is Too Much To Ask)

On average in America, full-time working women earn 77% of what men earn. In order to earn the same as men, women need to work about 60 days more per year, if that’s possible. “Equal Pay Day” fell on April 14 this year, because that’s how far into the following year, women have to slave away to catch up with their male counterparts.

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Click to enlarge.

State-to-state, the differences are wider and narrower than the average, as you can see in the graphic here. It shows the dates at which women, symbolically speaking, “stop being paid” for each state. The biggest differences are in gray and lighter blues; the smallest differences are in darker blues and black.

Louisiana stands out as having the greatest deficit. Women there earn 34% less than men, meaning they’re working “for free” as far back as August. By contrast, women in Washington D.C. get paid right up to November 29. The analysis, from a B2B marketplace called Expert Market, is based on median earnings in each state.

The good news is that the gaps have been narrowing over time. As this Pew Research video explains, women were paid 36 cents less on every dollar than men in 1980; the gap is now 16 cents (this number is based on hourly earning for both full- and part-time workers; the 77 cent number above is based on the difference between men and women’s median earnings). And the differences have particularly shortened for women first entering the workplace. From a 33 cent divergence in 1980, it’s down to just 7 cents. Still, that’s still an unacceptable gap, effectively meaning young women have to work until the end of January to earn the same as young men.

If you want to see even more data, we published some other pay gap maps here.

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