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This Animated Short Proves Snoop Was Right: “Game Of Thrones” Is Based On Actual History

Watch an animated short that reveals how Game of Thrones was inspired by actual historical wars. (Maybe Snoop Dogg was right after all!)

There will always be notable quotables in a Snoop Dogg interview, and the ones that found traction in a recent chat with the New York Post pertained to HBO’s apocryphal dragon serial, Game of Thrones:

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“I watch it for historic reasons, to try to understand what this world was based on before I got here. I like to know how we got from there, to here, and the similarities between then and now.”

Fo shizzle? This statement was instantly seized on as being among Snoop Dogg’s most questionable brain-farts, alongside the announcement a few years back that he would henceforth be known as Snoop Lion, reggae raconteur. Misguided and possibly resin-caked as Snoop’s words may have been, they were slightly more accurate than one might think. Dragons and high priestesses of the Lord of Light aside, there is some basis in fact for the events of Game of Thrones, and a new video proves it.


Created by TED-Ed’s Alex Gendler, and animated by Brett Underhill, The Wars That Inspired Game of Thrones illuminates some unmistakable similarities between historical conflict The War of the Roses and the events currently unfolding in Westeros. It seems that when King Edward III died in 1377, his throne went to his deceased eldest son’s 10-year old child, Richard II. King Edward’s other three sons apparently did not take being skipped over in favor of a 10-year old very well, and raised generations of contentious clans known as the Lancasters and the Yorks. If those names look familiar, it’s either because medieval English history is better taught in some schools than others, or because the names are the inspiration for Lannisters and Starks–the most prominent of the nine Great Houses on Game of Thrones.

Gendler’s video details the long-running power struggle of the War of The Roses–so named for the symbols of the two families–and it shows historical counterparts for characters such as Ned Stark and Cersei Lannister. Although, unfortunately, there is no apparent evidence of a factual basis for corpse-reviving snow monsters. Not yet, anyway.

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