advertisement
advertisement

Take Control Of Your Farts With This Wearable Gas Tracker

The quantified flatulence.


It was only a matter of time. Trackers exist that measure our heartbeat, our walking pace, our sleep cycles. Now, one is here to gauge the most basic of bodily functions: our farts.

advertisement

Most people know enough not to eat a massive plate of beans before a first date. But the average person passes gas something like 13 times a day, according to the makers of a new wearable device to track your flatulance. The premise of the Ch4 device is to figure out what else you need to do if you’d like to avoid uncomfortable releases during, say, an important meeting.

Please enjoy earlier fart coverage from Co.Exist:
• These High-Tech Underwear Keep Your Farts From Smelling
• These Backpacks For Cows Collect Their Fart Gas And Store It For Energy
• Cutting Through Nutrition Hot Air By Teaching Kids How To Eat Better—Through Their Farts

The device, which is currently a prototype on Kickstarter, contains electronics, a sensor that detects gas release, and Bluetooth equipment. It’s meant to be worn either in your back pocket or clipped to the back of your pants. It’ll detect methane gas, send the data to a smartphone app, where you–the user–are also tracking your meals. (Though it’s worth wondering how sensitive this sensor actually is; I’d like to hope not every gas release actually makes it to the outside world.) Over time, the idea is that hopefully you’ll see a correlation between farts and foods you eat. The Ch4 is a project from Rodrigo Narciso, a graduate student in NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program.

I was thinking this would be an awesome gift for a certain gaseous friend of mine, but then noticed the $120 price tag for Kickstarter backers. That’s a lot of money for what would essentially be a gag for all but the most dedicated self-tracking bunch or maybe for green die-hards who want to reduce their greenhouse gas footprint. With less than $2,000 contributed of a $180,000 fundraising goal, it looks like many people agree.

advertisement
advertisement

About the author

Jessica Leber is a staff editor and writer for Fast Company's Co.Exist. Previously, she was a business reporter for MIT’s Technology Review and an environmental reporter at ClimateWire

More