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Would Young Unemployed People Rather Deal Drugs, Go On Welfare, Or Find A Job? This Cringe-Making Video Tackles Our Assumptions

Would Young Unemployed People Rather Deal Drugs, Go On Welfare, Or Find A Job? This Cringe-Making Video Tackles Our Assumptions

Stereotypes often portray young unemployed people as feckless layabouts but this new campaign from a U.K. charity aims to smash those perceptions, and does via an effective, if sometimes hard-to-watch subterfuge.

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The “Jobs for the Jobless” campaign encourages employers to take on young people by showing they are keen, decent, and simply want a real job.

The centerpiece of the drive is a short film, which shows six unsuspecting candidates being interviewed by an actor posing as a career advisor. He suggests they should consider other life paths instead of working, including getting pregnant to claim benefits or perhaps a career in drug dealing. No spoilers as to how the candidates respond, you’ll have to watch the film.

The campaign, created by ad agency Publicis London for U.K. youth employment charity Circle, asks people to visit a website where they are invited to tweet support for the six young candidates directly to some of the U.K.’s biggest employers.


The website hosts video resumes for the young hopefuls, who are all from Hackney in London. The “donated” tweets are automatically generated and one, for example, reads: “@Topshop @ASOS @Drapers Please help Eniola get her dream job in fashion #joblessgeneration” with a link to the candidate’s profile.

The youngsters are looking for jobs in a range of professions including accountancy, painting and decorating, personal training, fashion and beauty, banking and retail. Employers can also donate job opportunities via the website.


There are almost 1 million unemployed young people in the U.K. today and the charity says prejudice is causing many of them to miss out on opportunities. It is hoped the campaign will not only find the six participants in the film a job but also kickstart a wider conversation about tackling youth unemployment.

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