advertisement
advertisement

Instead Of Pin-Up Models, This Calendar Features Extreme Weather Porn

Dramatized art of dust storms, monsoons, and drought show just how bad nature’s wrath could get in the future.

As a classic piece of business swag, free wall calendars usually try to feature something pretty and innocuous, like bucolic nature scenes or baby animals. But when a Russian insurance company made its calendar this year, it decided on something a little more apocalyptic: Beautiful scenes of nature wreaking havoc on civilization.

advertisement

“All of these are real events that took place,” says Evgeny Kazantsev, the artist who illustrated each scene, taking a few liberties as he went along. “Of course, we made it look more theatrical than in reality. I bet if there were some eyewitnesses of those cataclysms they would be pretty surprised looking at what we made of it.”


One scene shows a ski resort without snow, something that isn’t hard to imagine in a place like California, where the drought shut down resorts this year. Other images show a dust storm in Spain, a monsoon in India, and a flock of swarming birds losing their sense of navigation during a storm in Pennsylvania.

Each of the scenes is rendered as realistically as possible. “I like a combination of the high resolution hyper-realistic technique, the unusual content, and the artistic approach,” says Kazantsev. “The meaning here was to make a photo with all its small details which is also fantastic and made according to the laws of art.”


Though the calendar has a clear commercial message–buy insurance, because crazy things can and will happen–it’s equally interesting as a way to visualize the extreme weather that climate change is making more common.

Many of the signs of climate change are still happening too subtly, or too distantly, for most of us to think about in everyday life, like the fact that this winter was the warmest on record in the U.S., or that the sea ice in the Arctic is at a record winter low. Maybe images like these–just like the Postcards of the Future series from U.K. artists–can help make some of the local impacts of climate change seem just a little easier to imagine.

advertisement
advertisement

About the author

Adele Peters is a staff writer at Fast Company who focuses on solutions to some of the world's largest problems, from climate change to homelessness. Previously, she worked with GOOD, BioLite, and the Sustainable Products and Solutions program at UC Berkeley, and contributed to the second edition of the bestselling book "Worldchanging: A User's Guide for the 21st Century."

More