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This Year’s Serpentine Pavilion Looks Like Rainbow Poop

This Year’s Serpentine Pavilion Looks Like Rainbow Poop
Serpentine Pavilion designed by SelgasCano 2015 Indicative CGI, night

It seems like Spanish architects SelgasCano followed in their supposedly psilocybin-loving forefather Antoni Gaudí’s footsteps when designing the 15th annual Serpentine Pavilion, a psychedelic cocoon webbed in plastic fabric.

The Day–Glo design, which looks like either a fabulous acid trip or rainbow poop (or both!), has labyrinthine corridors. As you walk through the various chambers, the light shifts in color, from warm reds to moody blues to yellows and pinks, thanks to a stained-glass effect created by ETFE plastic membranes and woven webbing.

Serpentine Pavilion designed by SelgasCano 2015, External indicative CGI

The architects, José Selgas and Lucía Cano, work in their own cocoon of sorts, a tubular office space in a forest outside Madrid. Both graduates of the Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura, they’re fans of playful, circus-influenced designs–some of their earlier projects include the orange-roofed Factory Mérida, a sports facility equipped with sculptural climbing walls and curvy skate bowls, El B, a striped performing arts center, and a hanging garden for the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale.

The Serpentine Pavilion has been built every year since the summer of 2000 on the lawn of London’s Serpentine Gallery. The temporary structure is built over the course of six months, and is meant to showcase the work of an international architect or design team that hasn’t yet completed a building in England. Past Pavilion architects have included Zaha Hadid, Toyo Ito, Sou Fujimoto, and Smiljan Radic.

The royal park of London’s Kensington Gardens will get its Alice in Wonderland-esque makeover in June. The structure will be dismantled in October.

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