advertisement
advertisement

Breastfeeding In, Revenge Porn Out: Facebook Redefines Its Content Banning Policies

Breastfeeding In, Revenge Porn Out: Facebook Redefines Its Content Banning Policies
[Photo: Flickr user Marcin Wichary]

Facebook has taken flak for banning some things but not others–often getting pressure from both supporters and critics, as with user photos of breastfeeding. The New York Times reports that the social network has now released an updated rulebook for what it bans and why, along with a list of ban requests by governments.

No, Facebook still isn’t using automated features to scan for offending material: They’re sticking with reactive moderating, reviewing every piece of flagged material manually. Unfortunately, this means flagged posts can stay up for up to 48 hours before Facebook gets to them, head of global policy at Facebook Monika Bickert told The New York Times. The most notable change might be the updated Community Standards’ ban on supporting or praising groups that are involved in violent, criminal, or hateful behavior, which is ripe for warring interpretation. The new rules also solidify bans on threatening physical or financial harm as well as posts encouraging suicide or eating disorders (such as thinspiration).

Some of the updated Community Standards follow recent outrage from the court of popular opinion. Bullying to degrade or shame others will be banned, along with content promoting sexual violence or exploitation, including revenge porn. But Facebook is also becoming a bit more nuanced when it comes to nudity: Photos displaying genitals or fully exposed butts won’t fly, but posts displaying breastfeeding and breasts showing post-mastectomy scars will make the cut.

Facebook also published its latest transparency report, announcing that they had banned 9,707 posts due to governments’ requests in the second half of 2014, up 11% compared to the first half of 2014. India and Turkey take up a whopping 97% of those bans, with India at 5,832 bans and Turkey at 3,624. No content was banned in the U.S.

[via The New York Times]

advertisement
advertisement