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Leadership

Writing Exercises Scientifically Proven To Redirect Your Life

Need to find a new direction or reclaim inspiration? Grab a pen and paper. These writing exercises can help.

[Photo: Flickr user rodtuk]

We're total suckers for self improvement: The self-help industry brings in billions of dollars each year from countless books. All that encouraging advice can feel empowering and commonsensical, offering a simple path to a better life.

But there's a problem with this approach. "Reading a self-help book is like buying a lottery ticket," writes social psychologist Timothy Wilson in his newest book Redirect. "For a small investment, we get hope in return; the dream that all our problems will soon be solved without any real expectation that they will be."

While the power of positive thinking—the seeming bread and butter of self-help as we know it—is a nice thought, according to Wilson, there's no evidence that simply thinking positively actually works. We can't just will ourselves to be happier a-la The Secret. "Our minds aren’t that stupid," says Wilson. "It's not like you can just tell you mind, 'Think positively.' You've got to nudge it a little more along."

In Redirect, Wilson offers an alternative he calls "story editing," based on the research of social scientists over the years. This approach operates off the premise that we each have a core narrative or story that we tell ourselves about who we are and what the world around us is like. It's a story that influences our choices and way of experiencing the world. But it's also one we play a major role in shaping for ourselves.

Using specific writing exercises, according to Wilson, we can begin to shift that story and redirect our way of thinking. "Writing is an act of creation. You are creating as you go," he says. "That’s what can make this personally so helpful."

Write through a challenging problem

We can never simply write painful or difficult events out of our lives, but we can make them far more graspable and change our relationship to them, according to research by psychologist James Pennebaker. Over the years, Pennebaker has developed an approach he calls "Writing To Heal," that uses writing exercises as a way to help people deal with difficult events their lives.

To try the Pennebaker writing exercise, think of an event or worry that's been most on your mind recently. Set aside 15 to 20 minutes at the end of the day to write about that specific problem. Do this for four days in a row, setting aside at least 15 minutes at the end of each day to record your thoughts. As you write, don't pause or second-guess yourself—just write without stopping.

Through his research over the years, Pennebaker found that this simple four-day exercise helped improve people's health, and well-being in various studies. "It's how we deal with setbacks that's so important," says Wilson, who has worked with Pennebaker over the years. While the writing exercise can be difficult at first, people tend to gain clarity as they continue doing it. "Often what they first write is jumbled and unorganized," says Wilson. But eventually "they view what happened to them in a way that makes more sense."

Distance yourself from negative experiences

Research has also shown that having some distance from a difficult event allows us to step back and better understand it. There's a writing exercise Wilson calls the "step-back-and-ask-why" approach that allows us to create this distance and understanding in order to reframe negative events.

To do this exercise, close your eyes and bring yourself back to a specific moment or event that was upsetting to you. Then, in your mind, try to take a few steps back from yourself in the moment so that you can see the story unfolding as if it was happening to a distant version of yourself. Write about what that distant version of yourself is thinking and feeling. One way to do this effectively, suggests Wilson, is to write in the third person, rather than the first person, which automatically builds some seperation between you and the moment you're writing about.

Don't simply rehash a play-by-play of what happened; instead, try to explain why it happened. "Don't recount the event," Wilson writes. "Take a step back and reconstrue and explain it."

Determine what your best possible self looks like

There's a reason Saturday Night Live's "Daily Affirmations With Stuart Smalley" was such a hit in the '90s. That focus on self-affirming mantras is practically begging to be made fun of, yet even today, you'll find that same advice given in total earnest.

But as Wilson points out in his book, rather than telling yourself you're doing the best you can and are the best you can be—a pretty text-book self-help mantra—try actually imagining what the best version of yourself might look like in the future and what you need to do to achieve those goals.

He calls this writing prompt the "Best Possible Selves Exercise." Like the Pennebaker prompt, take 15 to 20 minutes a night for four nights in a row to do this exercise. Imagine your life in the future as if you've achieved all your life goals. Write not just what those life goals are, but also how you will be able to achieve them. "Focus on the process of achieving an outcome rather than the outcome itself," says Wilson.

Imagine all the things that could have gone wrong

Gratitude journals are another self-help go-to, but research has shown they can actually have the reverse effect of making you feel less happy. There's a pleasure to uncertainty—not being able to pin down the specific details of an event were was pleasing.

While reducing our uncertainty about negative events can help us bounce back from them more quickly, reducing uncertainty about positive events can take some of the pleasure out of them. Wilson calls this a pleasure paradox: "People want to understand the good things in life so that they can experience them again, but by doing so they reduce the pleasure they get from those events," he writes.

For example, research has shown that asking people in a relationship to tell the story of how they met their partner doesn't make them particularly happier. But ask those same people to write about the many ways in which they might not have met their partner or their relationship might not have worked out and they get much more pleasure out of the exercise. "People don’t like to do that, but when they do, it makes the relationship look special again, at least for a little while," he says.

This translates well into a writing exercise Wilson calls the "George Bailey Technique" named after the protagonist in It's A Wonderful Life. For this exercise, think of one of the most important or special events, relationships or accomplishments in your life. Then imagine all the ways in which it might not have happened. Doing this can introduce mystery and excitement back into the experience again.

Maintain a sense of purpose

These last two exercises aren't so much writing prompts, as they are calls to action. In their studies of what make people feel happiest and most fulfilled, social scientists have found that having a clear sense of purpose is critical. This means reminding yourself of what your most important goals in life are and finding ways to move forward on those goals, says Wilson.

He identifies three ingredients to well-being: hope, meaning, and purpose. Writing exercises that help reframe the way you feel about negative events in the past can help create a sense of hope and meaning, but it's also important to maintain goals that provide a sense of purpose in your life. "We all have some choice over what we want to pursue and those of us who are really lucky can get paid to do it, but plenty of people find other ways," says Wilson.

Do some good in the world

Research has shown that it's not simply having a sense of purpose that contributes to our well-being, but that those who help others are actually happier than those who don't. These people have a greater likelihood of forming bonds with others and having a positive image of themselves.

"If you want to have a positive outlook and feel like a good person, go out and be a good person," says Wilson. "The mind is a very good observer of ourselves."

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