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The Dish’s Andrew Sullivan Is Giving Up Blogging After 15-Year Run

The renowned blogger is calling it a day.

The Dish’s Andrew Sullivan Is Giving Up Blogging After 15-Year Run

Influential political blogger and editor of The Dish, Andrew Sullivan, says he is giving up blogging after almost a decade and a half.

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In a heartfelt note to readers, Sullivan writes, “One of the things I’ve always tried to do at the Dish is to be up-front with readers.” He then lists the reasons for his decision–including health concerns and a desire to spend more time with his family. Sullivan also says he’s ready for a new challenge:

“There comes a time when you have to move on to new things, shake your world up, or recognize before you crash that burn-out does happen… I am saturated in digital life and I want to return to the actual world again. I’m a human being before I am a writer; and a writer before I am a blogger, and although it’s been a joy and a privilege to have helped pioneer a genuinely new form of writing, I yearn for other, older forms. I want to read again, slowly, carefully. I want to absorb a difficult book and walk around in my own thoughts with it for a while. I want to have an idea and let it slowly take shape, rather than be instantly blogged. I want to write long essays that can answer more deeply and subtly the many questions that the Dish years have presented to me. I want to write a book.”

While he doesn’t give an exact date for his departure from blogging, Sullivan notes that payment auto-renewals on The Dish have been suspended, while the pay meter has been disabled.

Begun in 2000, The Dish (originally The Daily Dish) switched to a subscription pay model in 2013. The move was very successful, with more than $500,000 in $19.95 pre-subscription sales racking up within the first month alone.

“In just two years, you built a million dollar revenue company, with 30,000 subscribers, a million monthly readers, and revenue growth of 17 percent over the first year,” Sullivan wrote in today’s blog post. “You made us unique in this media world–and we were able to avoid the sirens of clickbait and sponsored content. We will never forget it.”

In 2002, Fast Company called Sullivan “the most influential print journalist in Washington today.” Thanks for everything, Andrew.

[via The Dish]