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Survey: 1 In 7 Employees Would Sell Their Passwords For As Little As $150

A reminder about the importance of strong security practices.

Survey: 1 In 7 Employees Would Sell Their Passwords For As Little As $150
[Photo: Flickr user J R]

How much money would it take to get you to sell out your company by revealing its most personal data? In an ideal world, of course, the answer to that question would be that no amount is enough for you to risk damaging your employer or customers in this way.

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Sadly, the real world’s not always like that.

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In fact, according to a recent SailPoint survey of 1,000 employees at various large organizations in the U.S., U.K, Netherlands, Australia, France, and Germany, a terrifyingly large number of people (one in seven) would reveal their passwords for as little as $150.

One in five survey respondents also admitted to routinely sharing login information with other members of their team—meaning that the passwords up for sale may not be exclusively their own. 14% of employees further admitted to recycling the same password for every application they use.

“Employees may have moved away from the Post-it note password list, but using the same password across personal and work applications exposes the company,” Kevin Cunningham, president and founder of SailPoint, said in a press release. “Just think of the major breaches that occurred in 2014 requiring users to change their passwords on social media. If those were the same passwords being used to access mission-critical applications, it’s very easy for hacking organizations to take advantage and get into more valuable areas.”

While Cunningham certainly has a point, he may even be downplaying the seriousness of password security. According to another recent piece of research, 2014’s most popular password was nothing more complex than “123456.” The second most popular? “Password.”

Until biometric tools like Touch ID and voice identification become ubiquitous across all platforms, written passcodes are going to remain a pain. However, as the recent Sony hacks have shown, the potential damage of a security breach is immeasurable.

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Hopefully findings like SailPoint’s hammer home just how seriously both individuals and companies need to take their security.

[via Business Wire]