advertisement
advertisement

Watch All The Ads Worth Watching From Super Bowl 2015

Bud’s puppy returns, Newcastle actually does it, BMW goes back in time, and much more.

Watch All The Ads Worth Watching From Super Bowl 2015

advertisement

The week before the Super Bowl has predictably seen a flurry of commercial activity, hype and hyperbole with more and more brands rolling out their big game ads to kickstart some momentum before Sunday. Celebrities! Puppies! GoDaddy even managed to ban its own ad ahead of time.

Not everyone spilled their Super Bowl ad secrets before the game, but here are all the commercials worth watching.

McDonald’s “Pay With Lovin'”

Starting the day after the Super Bowl, McDonald’s says it will start accepting new forms of payment–in the currency of love and affection. Not in a turning-tricks-for-cheeseburgers sort of way, more like a calling your mom to say “I love you” type deal.

Budweiser “Lost Dog”

The beer brand and agency Anomaly double down on last year’s “Puppy Love” and bring us another furry adventure that will have you soaking up tears with those Doritos.

BMW “Newfangled Idea”

BMW and agency KBS take us back to 1994 with TV hosts Katie Couric and Bryant Gumbel on The Today Show debating the meaning and logic behind a simple email address. Fast-forward 20 years and the two are sitting in a shiny new, electric BMW i3 and discussing its many futuristic features in much the same manner. The spot has been one of the breakout hits of the pre-game so far, with 4.3 million views on YouTube to date.

Dove Men+Care “#RealStrength”

Last Father’s Day, the first version of this ad went viral. More than 12 million views later, the brand is bringing the spot back (now dubbed #RealStrength) to make Super Bowl fans weep man tears into their giant beers and nachos. It’s pretty much the same spot, with slight tweaks, but don’t call it a copout. Unilever director of marketing Jen Bremner says the huge response to the original prompted the brand to do more research and use the big game to bring the spot—which was online-only—to TV for the first time.

advertisement

Lexus “Make Some Noise”

While most brands dress themselves up all pretty and get fancy celebrity dates, Lexus is heading to the big ad dance in slacks and a shirt. The spot, by agency Walton Isaacson, with its electro soundtrack (enhanced with the old “sounds of the product making music” trick) dancers and its new NX model zipping around a dark warehouse, is a pretty basic car ad more befitting a midseason NHL game.

Toyota “How Great I Am”

The carmaker and agency Saatchi & Saatchi Los Angeles juxtapose Paralympic snowboarder Amy Purdy shredding on the mountain, ballroom dancing and more, all to the voiceover of an awesome 1974 rant by Muhammad Ali outlining all the ways he had achieved greatness. Toyota has another spot in the game, but you’re going to have to wait for that one.

Carl’s Jr. “Au Naturel”

Model Charlotte McKinney bares it all (sort of) for the fast feeder’s new burger with grass-fed, free-range beef with no added hormones, steroids, or antibiotics. The regional ad, by agency 72andSunny, got people as upset as you’d expect.

Victoria’s Secret “Let The Real Games Begin”

Created in-house, this is exactly what you’d expect from a lingerie-filled hard sell pitch for Valentine’s Day.

Kia “The Perfect Getaway”

Here, in a spot by agency David&Goliath, we see Pierce Brosnan prepping for a role he’s not quite expecting.

Eat24 “Hangry?”

Snoop Dogg and comedian Gilbert Gottfried define the term “hangry” and, lo and behold, Eat24 comes to the rescue of this awful munchies-based affliction. The food delivery service will be airing the spot in five markets—Los Angeles, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., Miami, and Baltimore.

advertisement

Newcastle “Band of Brands”

Some said it couldn’t be done. But Newcastle and agency Droga5 took this gag to its logical and most impressive extreme by cramming 36 other brands in its official Super Bowl ad.

Mercedes-Benz “Fable”

The ad, by agency Merkley + Partners New York, retells the classic story of “The Tortoise and The Hare,” but with a Mercedes’ AMG GT helping out our shell-bound friend.

NFL “No More”

This PSA by agency Grey New York uses the audio from a real 911 call over an unsettling film of the after effects of domestic abuse to get its message across. Considering all the controversy the league’s been dealing with around this issue this year, it’s no surprise it’s using its biggest stage to make a statement.

Wix “It’s That Easy”

The cloud-based web development platform, and agency Committee LA, give former NFL stars like Brett Favre, Emmitt Smith, and Terrell Owens some post-football career advice. This is the extended version of its 30-second big game ad. Favre & Carve!

T-Mobile “Kim’s Data Stash”

Kim Kardashian makes an impassioned plea for you to consider all the lost mobile data you could’ve had to better enjoy her make-up, tennis backhand, outfits, vacations, and outfits (again).

Bud Light “Real Life Pac-Man”

For the latest instalment of the brand’s “Up For Whatever” campaign, Bud Light and agency EnergyBBDO give two dudes the chance to play a real-life version of the classic arcade game.

advertisement

The Verge “Leaked Super Bowl Ad”

The ad was “leaked” online and will air during the Super Bowl exclusively in Helena, Montana. The site’s parent company Vox Media has said the airtime cost the brand $700. Not a bad bargain to be lumped in with all the other Super Bowl ads.

Mophie “All-Powerless”

The portable phone charger, and agency Deutsch LA, uses its first Super Bowl ad to show what a disaster of biblical proportions it can be when your phone dies.

Snickers “The Brady Bunch”

The brand and agency BBDO New York show us the threat of imminent violence is ever-present when Marcia and Jan Brady get hungry.

GrubHub “Because Burrito”

It’ll be the battle of the regional Super Bowl ads as the online food delivery platform is bringing back this delightfully violent spot, by agency Barton F. Graf 9000, to take on Eat24 in the same five markets—Los Angeles, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., Miami, and Baltimore.

T-Mobile “Data Vulture”

Rob Riggle stars with a pretty awful pet bird in this spot created exclusively for NBC’s web stream of the game.

Avocados From Mexico “First Draft Ever”

The delicious and nutritious fruit does a little historical revisionism on natural selection for its first-ever Super Bowl ad.

advertisement

Lexus “Let’s Play”

After

–>

got more than 600,000 views in just two days barely a week before the Super Bowl, Lexus decided to bring its one-tenth model of its RC F performance coupe to the big game.

Loctite “Positive Feelings”


Read more here about why these dancers love their fanny packs so much.

Esurance “Sorta Your Mom”

What are the differences between Lindsay Lohan and your mom? Nope, not the start of a joke, just an Esurance Super Bowl ad. Check out the behind the scenes here.

Carnival “Back to the Sea”


An inspired idea by agency BBDO Atlanta to use a 1962 JFK speech for Carnival’s Super Bowl ad–makes you almost forget the words “poop” and “cruise” were ever uttered together.

Nissan “With Dad”


Nissan and agency TBWA/Chiat/Day LA are aiming for nothing less than full-on waterworks here, with a dad suffering from guilt, who also happens to be a champion race car driver, the kid watching dad triumph at home yet still harbors a deep melancholy over his lack of paternal bonding, all set to “Cat’s in the freakin’ Cradle?”

advertisement

Weight Watchers “All You Can Eat”


Aaron Paul is your junk food pusher. Read more about the spot here.

Nationwide “Boy”

Read more here about the strategy behind bringing this dark and somber ad to the Super Bowl.

GoDaddy “Work”

See what the brand swapped in for its controversial puppy situation.

Esurance “Say My Name”

Bryan Cranston follows Lindsay Lohan as the brand ups a great gag to get a good point across about its product.

Coca-Cola “#MakeItHappy”

Coke and agency Wieden+Kennedy Portland want to make the Internet a more positive place by using a hashtag #MakeItHappy on Twitter and Instagram to magically make negative posts happy.

Microsoft “Braylon O’Neill”

Microsoft brings an inspiring story to the big game, and an adorable human face to the power of advanced technology.

advertisement

Skittles “Settle It”


Skittles takes us to a town where disputes are settled the old-fashioned, totally weird way.

Clash of Clans “Revenge”

The same sense of giddy mischief that’s made all the Clash ads so fun, funny and viral, now with 100% more Angry Liam Neeson.

Lexus “Play Time”

Based on the online response to a series of short videos featuring a remote-controlled, one-tenth model of the brand’s RC F performance coupe doing fast and furious driving tricks—posted less than week ago— the brand decided to take its toy car to the Super Bowl.

Pepsi “Halftime Touches Down”

Is it aliens? Our benevolent sugar water overlords? Turns out, it was much better thanks to Katy Perry and a much-welcome cameo by Missy Elliott.

Sprint “Super Apology”

The mobile carrier goes full barnyard in this call-out of competitors AT&T and Verizon.

Dodge “Wisdom”

The car brand joins the replay club–Always, Dove Men+Care–bringing back a great ad from last summer featuring some advice from some savvy old-timers.

advertisement

Jeep “Beautiful Lands”

Uhh, someone at Jeep really liked that North Face ad from a few months ago.

Nationwide “Invisible Mindy Kaling”

Before bringing the mood waaaay down, Nationwide brought the funny with Kaling–who tweeted out a shot from the shoot as soon as the ad ran.

T-Mobile “One-Upped”


Because we all need a phone that can make calls from our underground petting zoo.

Budweiser “Brewed The Hard Way”

A 60-second middle finger to all things craft beer.

Doritos “Middle Seat”

Behold! The big winner of this year’s “Crash the Super Bowl” contest.

Fiat “Blue Pill”

We’re no experts, but this is probably not what happens when you accidentally drop a boner pill into a car.

advertisement

Toyota “My Bold Dad”

If Dove or Nissan didn’t make enough eyes well up, this second Toyota spot directed by Lance Acord has the crying dad right there in it.

About the author

Jeff Beer is a staff editor at Fast Company, covering advertising, marketing, and brand creativity. He lives in Toronto.

More