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Nationwide Wants You To Get Serious About Kid Safety

A new app will tell you how dangerous your house is.

Back in 1954, Nationwide’s insurance agents would hand out a brochure to families expecting children, outlining how the number one cause of death among children in the U.S. was preventable accidental injuries, the bulk of which happen around the home, with suggestions on how to minimize that risk. Now 60 years later, the brand is doing the same thing. Well, sort of.

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The brand has partnered with Safe Kids Worldwide, a global organization dedicated to preventing injuries in children, and Nationwide Children’s Hospital for its new campaign “Make Safe Happen,” the prime focus of which is its new home safety app.


According to the CDC, preventable accidents are still the top cause of death for children under 12 in the U.S. And yet, recent research from Nationwide found only one-third (37%) of parents believed they need to do a better job of keeping their children safe. Nationwide created an app to help parents and caregivers address this issue, bringing that old brochure into the 21st century. Using content from Nationwide Children’s Hospital, the app provides parents room-by-room safety checklists, and reminders for things like replacing smoke alarm batteries, as well as quick links to Amazon to buy safety products directly.


“All parents have mobile devices and the app is critical for people to access the information anytime and anywhere they want,” says Nationwide chief marketing officer Matt Jauchius. “It puts research-driven, easily-consumed information in parents’ hands to help keep kids safe. Creating this awareness and the app is a start in letting people know about the risks and giving them a tool to help deal with them.”

Jauchius says the company has been supporting children’s safety awareness quietly for at least 60 years, and this campaign is a re-commitment to that cause and showcasing what our brand is all about. “This campaign speaks to the essence of our brand,” says Jauchius. “This is not advertising to sell a product. It has two purposes–the first is to help save kids’ lives. At the same time, we also want people to know what we stand for.”

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About the author

Jeff Beer is a staff editor at Fast Company, covering advertising, marketing, and brand creativity. He lives in Toronto.

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