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Here’s The Only EULA You’ll Ever Want To Read

By design, end-user license agreement, or EULAs, are impenetrable documents letting users of a given piece of software know their rights, and written by lawyers trying to cover their clients’ asses. EULAs are so ridiculous and all encompassing, the 18,000-word EULA you click through when you install iTunes forbids you from creating nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons.

Florence Meunier, a third-year graphic design student at Central Saint Martins, London, was asked to redesign another of Apple’s EULAs–the 13-page, 9,000-word iCloud agreement–for a recent school project. And she got clever with it, too, repurposing the original, legalese-filled text into a 13-page cautionary tale about a man who agrees to things too quickly, and consequently loses the agency to disagree forever.


Meunier’s project places the original iCloud EULA text into a saddle-stitched paper booklet. Opaque sheets with small boxes cut out of them are bound between every two pages of text: by resting them against the page, only the words of the story Meunier means to tell show up, effectively creating the second narration within the existing text.


“By clicking ‘I Agree,’ we accept rather odd conditions that we are not aware of because the very design of it is not intended to be read,” Meunier writers about her project. “[My] goal was to design a EULA that would make the user want to read it.” Or, at the very least, 30 or 40 words of it, which, let’s face it, is more than we usually read when it comes to EULAs.

Check out Meunier’s website here.

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