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Massive Project Brings Albert Einstein’s Work To The Internet

Massive Project Brings Albert Einstein’s Work To The Internet
[Photo: Flickr user thierry ehrmann]

When Albert Einstein died in 1955, he bequeathed his copyright to Princeton University and Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Since 1986, the two schools have been studying more than 80,000 documents he left behind both in Princeton and around the world. Now, the documents are being put online for the whole world to see, read, and share.

Digital Einstein has so far produced 13 volumes of letters, postcards, notebooks, papers, and more. The editor of the project, Diana Kormos-Buchwald, a professor of physics and the history of science at the California Institute of Technology, expects the project to publish 30 volumes in total.

According to the New York Times:

The published volumes contain about 5,000 documents that bring Einstein’s story up to 1923, when he turned 44, in ever-thicker, black-jacketed, hard-bound books, dense with essays, footnotes and annotations detailing the political, personal and cultural life of the day. A separate set of white paperback volumes contains English translations.

Whether in German or English, it’s bound to be perfect for some light weekend reading.DM