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Rdio Seizes On Spotify’s Misstep, Announces Price Drop

Rdio Seizes On Spotify’s Misstep, Announces Price Drop
[Photo: Flickr user Sigfrid Lundberg]

This week’s news that Taylor Swift pulled her albums from Spotify over concerns about artistic and financial integrity has been a real boon for subscription-based music-streaming services that are not Spotify Premium. While conspiracy theorists can point to the recent past and chance it that 1989 and the rest of Swift’s discography will return, it’s hard to ignore that other services like Vevo (another ad-based distribution system, albeit one that’s as much about the video as the bass), Rdio, and Beats have not been affected.

Of those services, only Rdio appears to be taking advantage of Spotify’s misfortune and striking while the iron is hot. Armed with all the Taylor Swift albums a streaming service could offer, Rdio announced this week that it was dropping the prices on its family plan. In what is likely an attempt to lure customers away from other services, the new Rdio plan is priced the same as Spotify Premium, starting at $14.99 for a family of two and rising $5 for each additional member (capping at five).

Similar to Spotify’s offering—and Netflix’s—the new Rdio plan allows for sub-accounts to keep each user’s playlists and favorites separate, as well as lift restrictions on who can listen on what device and when. Want to listen on your phone while your kid is using the computer? Now you can.

Rdio looks to be betting that more artists will follow Swift and abandon Spotify–and for a service that reportedly can only claim 500,000 users, it’s a bet worth making.

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