advertisement
advertisement

GitHub Reaches For The Cloud

GitHub Reaches For The Cloud
[Photo: Flickr user Matt Salas]

GitHub is a place for web developers to share and collaborate on code, and the service is about to become much more accessible.

The company is expected to announce on Tuesday that its Enterprise version will soon be available on the cloud via Amazon Web Services, a move that will likely expand the reach of the already widely used service. According to the New York Times‘s Bits blog, the number of work projects on GitHub’s Enterprise software has already hit 17 million, up from 10 million at the beginning of this year.

Companies previously hosted GitHub Enterprise on their own servers, a privilege for which they paid $20 per month. But with more and more businesses shutting down their data centers and moving processing operations to the cloud, GitHub for A.W.S. will ensure that the software will continue to be an attractive option.

“Over the next few years, some of the biggest companies will be shutting down practically all of their data centers,” GitHub founder and CEO Chris Wanstrath told the Times. Amazon is the first public cloud that GitHub is tackling, but there are plans to move onto others, he says.

GitHub’s smashing success this year is particularly remarkable, Bits notes, given the controversy the company has endured. In April, cofounder Tom Preston-Werner stepped down after a gender-based harassment investigation at the company. But GitHub not only survived: they’ve thrived. Earlier this year the company announced the launch of an educational site to help schools integrate GitHub into their curriculum. With availability on A.W.S., their reach is set to expand yet again.

advertisement
advertisement