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Report: Munchery Illegally Stored Food In Refrigerated Trucks (Updated)

Report: Munchery Illegally Stored Food In Refrigerated Trucks (Updated)
[Photo: Flickr user Kurt Bauschardt]

Update: In a blog post published Wednesday, Munchery CEO Tri Tran said the startup’s refrigerated trucks are emptied and cleaned after each day’s deliveries, not left idling throughout the day, and not used as overnight storage for food. Tran also sent Fast Company an inspection report from the Department of Public Health on Wednesday, three days after the allegations first arose, that noted no vehicles were being used as storage for food.

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Munchery, the mega-successful fresh meal delivery startup, is in hot water this week after reports that it is illegally storing food in refrigerated trucks overnight.

The San Francisco-based startup delivers “handcraft meals made from scratch each day in small batches.” Munchery expanded to Seattle in April 2014 after three years of local success. But Uptown Almanac reports that due to overwhelming demand, the San Francisco-based company’s Mission District kitchens have allowed their supply to overflow to the trucks parked on the street outside.

Neighbors have complained that the trucks are left idling all night, which creates noise and, more troubling, fumes and pollution.

Munchery cofounder and CEO Tri Tran told Fast Company via email, “The claims are completely false. We use refrigerated trucks to safely and legally transport food from/to our kitchen and fulfillment centers, and never use them to store food overnight.”

But a neighborhood informant says there’s at least one truck running at all times, which is illegal under California law. Another tipster claims Munchery tried to silence neighborhood dissent by offering free meals from the service.

[h/t: Valleywag]

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