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  • 11.11.14

Nissan’s Project Titan Sends War Vets And A Crowdsourced Super Truck To Alaska

The brand teams up with Facebook fans and Wounded Warrior Project for a unique campaign.

Nissan’s Project Titan Sends War Vets And A Crowdsourced Super Truck To Alaska

On Veteran’s Day and Remembrance Day, we’ll see countless tributes to military vets and service people from brands of all stripes. To mark the day, Nissan is launching a new content project almost a year in the making that combines its product, social media, and two Iraq war vets.

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In January, Nissan launched Project Titan with agency TBWA/Chiat/Day LA, inviting Facebook fans to help them build the ultimate off-road truck. The campaign culminates with this 21-minute short film, directed by J. Austin Wilson, that follows Iraq war vets David Guzman and Kevin McMahon on a journey through the Alaskan wilderness in the crowd-sourced Nissan Titan. The brand teamed with Wounded Warrior Project to select Guzman and McMahon, both who’ve suffered significant injuries throughout their military service. The film will air on H2 (History2 Channel) as well as online tomorrow on Hulu, Xbox Live, and the Nissan YouTube Channel.

This is the second crowd-sourced vehicle the brand has created–following last year’s Project 370Z. TBWA\Chiat\Day LA digital strategist Jonathan Carmona and Scot Cottick, senior manager of social media marketing for Nissan North America say the campaign combines lessons learned from Project 370Z and a bit of luck.

“It started out with the simple intention of partnering with our social media fans to help us build a really cool Nissan Titan,” Carmona says. “We thought it might be a good thing to actually take this truck out somewhere epic and truly prove it’s capability. Then we decided it’d be cool to partner with someone or an organization on this Titan adventure and share the experience. We talked to the guys at Wounded Warrior Project and we knew right then we want to work with these guys. It just snowballed from there.”


From the first fan vote to the release of the film took six months of production and 10 months of pre-planning. The brand decided to create the film as a way to promote both the truck and its partnership with Wounded Warrior Project. “Project 370Z taught us a major lesson about showing off the completed vehicle,” says Cottick. “For Project Titan, we wanted to find ways to show off the truck, not only to our fans, but to the public as a whole and showcase a partnership we’re really proud of.”

About the author

Jeff Beer is a staff editor at Fast Company, covering advertising, marketing, and brand creativity. He lives in Toronto.

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