advertisement
advertisement

What Does Your Voice Look Like As A Signature?

This innovative petition takes signatures by voice, and each signature is shaped by your vocal print.

advertisement
advertisement

“Mark. Wilson.” Dammit. “Marrrrk. Wilson.” Nope. “Maaaarkkkkuhh Wiiiiiiiiiiisuuoon.” There we go.

advertisement
advertisement

This is me signing my name with my voice at Child Hotline International, on a petition to raise awareness and resources for the service. Called Free Our Voices, it’s a clever campaign by Wieden+Kennedy and MPC Creative to turn the monotonous stamped-out signatures of a modern, digital petition into a more cacophonous collection of visual identities. Just as every person’s inked signature looks a little bit different, every signature on Free Our Voices will be unique, amplifying the idea that a few thousand names on a list are really a few thousand real people who care about a problem.


I also dig Free Our Voices for how it challenges the nature of our online identity in the digital age. It asks, why are we still “e-signing” documents in fake ink when our computers can blend biometrics and multimedia without breaking a sweat? Why are we signing PDFs in typed-out script when our laptop microphones can measure our vocal prints, and webcams can capture the curves of our faces?

Our signature is just a visualization of our identity from another age, based upon the movements of our hands as they dragged sticks across paper, offering an advantage to those goodie-goodies who wasted too much of their free time practicing their cursive. We can be romantic about that bygone era, or we can admit that it was a silly, mono-faceted aspect of who we are, and scream MAAARRRKK WIILLLLSSSOOOOOON* at the top of our lungs in bestial protest.

*Feel free to shout your own name.

Try it here.

[h/t Creative Review]

About the author

Mark Wilson is a senior writer at Fast Company who has written about design, technology, and culture for almost 15 years. His work has appeared at Gizmodo, Kotaku, PopMech, PopSci, Esquire, American Photo and Lucky Peach

More