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Looking For The Cheapest Weed In The U.S.? Head To Oregon

But Washington isn’t far behind.

Looking For The Cheapest Weed In The U.S.? Head To Oregon
[Photo: Flickr user Coleen Whitfield]
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Oregon is the state that holds claim to the cheapest weed in the union. On average, a gram of marijuana costs $9.78 in the Beaver State, a relative deal compared with the national average of $13.99.

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On Monday, marijuana reviews site Leafly published its State of the Leaf report summarizing the major trends in this budding industry. Of the two states that have legalized marijuana for recreational use, there’s a discrepancy between the per-gram cost at medical dispensaries and at retail outlets. In Colorado, which has raked in $7.74 million in tax revenue from the marijuana industry, a gram of medicinal marijuana costs $11.18, while a gram at retail stores costs $12.47. In Washington, the difference is more pronounced: A gram of weed for patients costs $9.89 (making it second to Oregon) versus $22.99 a gram at retail.


Leafly collected data on the conditions and symptoms people say marijuana helps them manage. In the U.S., the top conditions marijuana patients cite are anxiety, migraines, and attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Globally, people use marijuana to help manage glaucoma, arthritis, and asthma. The overwhelming majority of people say they prefer to smoke marijuana, followed by vaporization and the consumption of edible weed products.


The marijuana market is expected to top $10 billion by 2018, and Leafly has been on a campaign to bring weed into the mainstream. In August, the startup caused a stir by taking out a full-page ad in The New York Times congratulating New York State for passing the Compassionate Care Act.

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About the author

Based in San Francisco, Alice Truong is Fast Company's West Coast correspondent. She previously reported in Chicago, Washington D.C., New York and most recently Hong Kong, where she (left her heart and) worked as a reporter for the Wall Street Journal

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