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Millennials Care More About Having A Good Job Than Getting Married Or Buying A House

Millennials Care More About Having A Good Job Than Getting Married Or Buying A House
[Top photo: Flickr user Logan Campbell]

In spite of the dire tone of world affairs as of late, millennials in the U.S.–defined here as residents between 18 and 30–are more optimistic than they were last year.

That’s according to Telefonica’s second annual Global Millennial Survey, which asks thousands of young people around the world what they think about topics such as entrepreneurship and technology.

According to this year’s survey, education is on a lot of people’s minds. Some 66% of millennial respondents in the U.S. said that affordability needs more improvement than anything else in the education sector. The quality of teachers and curriculum don’t fall far behind. And there are ethnic and racial disparities: 34% of non-Hispanics say they had access to great educational opportunities, while only 28% of Hispanics say the same.

Unlike generations past, young Americans today care much more about having a job that pays well than about owning a home or marriage. As you can see in the image below, that’s true globally–in fact, U.S. residents care more about getting married than anywhere else surveyed.


Perhaps egged on by the instant millionaire and billionaires that seem to keep sprouting up in California, U.S. millennials are more likely to pursue careers in technology than anything else. They also believe that there are more opportunities for entrepreneurship this year than last.

The environment? Not that big of a deal, according to survey respondents. That ranks dead last when U.S. respondents were asked about the most important issues facing the world today. Economy is the biggest issue, followed by poverty, education, and healthcare. Globally, poverty is the biggest concern.

Overall, millennials in the U.S. believe things are going well, with 51% responding that they believe the country’s best days are ahead (compared to 44% last year). Here’s hoping that optimism never fades.AS