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Snapchat Says It Is Not Responsible For Any Allegedly Hacked Photos

Snapchat Says It Is Not Responsible For Any Allegedly Hacked Photos
[Photo: Flickr user Maurizio Pesce]

Late Thursday night, hackers who claim to have collected 13 GB worth of Snapchat photos through third-party apps reportedly released a flood of private images onto the Internet. (The site they were released through has since been taken down, although Business Insider reports that “thousands of people” have already downloaded the collection.)

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On the male-heavy message board 4chan, where the 200,000 or so photos might be published this weekend, the event has been dubbed the “Snappening” (which we won’t link to), a reference to last month’s big iCloud breach that saw the private photos of famous celebrities published onto sites like Reddit and Imgur.

The photos were said to be obtained through third-party clients, including SnapSave (an Android app) and the now defunct SnapSaved.com. Like SnapHack, these services keep Snapchat photos from disappearing after a set amount of time, as the original app intends them to do.

Worth mentioning now: The source of these reports comes from a blog called KennyWithers.com, which currently won’t load, leading some to believe that the whole event might be a hoax. Here is an alleged screenshot of a 4chan discussion of the hack (screenshot image was taken from KennyWithers.com before it went down):


Nevertheless on Friday morning, Snapchat said that its servers were intact and denied any culpability, tweeting:

If real, things could get ugly: 50% of Snapchat’s users fall between the ages of 13 and 17.

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