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The Recommender: Alice Truong, Who Wishes The Telegraph Would Make A Comeback

The best things on the Internet this week, curated by Fast Company employees.

The Recommender: Alice Truong, Who Wishes The Telegraph Would Make A Comeback
[Photo: Flickr user Xlibber]
Alice TruongPhoto: Celine Grouard for Fast Company

Name: Alice Truong
Role at Fast Company: Reporter reppin’ the Best Coast
Titillating fact: Earlier this year, I met Chris Hadfield, former commander of the International Space Station and No. 1 on my celebrities-I’d-love-to-meet list (OK, so I crossed off the only person on that list).

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Things she’s loving:

The Umbrella Revolution

As a former resident of Hong Kong, it’s fascinating to see the tension between the mainland and Hong Kong boil into the Umbrella Revolution. The South China Morning Post, the local English-language newspaper, has been a great source of what’s happening on the ground, sharing fantastic photos and updates while keeping up a liveblog the first few days. The money shot embedded in the tweet below is from freelance photog Lam Yik Fei, who’s taken many other stunning images throughout the protests.

The Ham Whisperer

Rusty on my Morse code, I decided this week that I was due for a refresher–you know, just in case (sheepishly looks around). The Ham Whisperer, a blog last updated in 2011, is my go-to source for all things radio. I tossed all those American Radio Relay League prep books I bought in favor of Andy’s (aka KE4GKP) video courses on YouTube, both when studying for my technician license to broadcast on the air waves and for practicing my dits and dahs. ..-. ..- -.

MetroMile

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Everybody hates parking tickets, but they are an unavoidable fact of life in San Francisco when you don’t have a parking spot. In San Francisco and Chicago, MetroMile–which offers an app that tracks cars’ fuel consumption, health, driving history, and location–will alert you to street sweeping restrictions with reminders to move your car. The company makes money off its pay-by-the-mile insurance (which we don’t use because our trusty 2001 Honda Accord logs too many miles for that model to make sense), but it provides the tracker, which plugs into the vehicle’s on-board diagnostics port (a USB-like port standard in all autos manufactured in 1996 or later), and the accompanying data for free.

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