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The Protest Art Of Occupy Hong Kong’s “Umbrella Revolution”

The Protest Art Of Occupy Hong Kong’s “Umbrella Revolution”

This week, tens of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets of Hong Kong’s central financial district to protest the Chinese government’s broken promise of democratic elections: they plan to vet electoral candidates in 2017.

Dubbed “Occupy Central with Love and Peace,” it was a non-violent protest, but riot police soon used pepper spray and tear gas against protesters. To protect themselves, protesters began using their umbrellas as shields, which they’d originally brought for shade from the midday sun. It led media to dub their movement “The Umbrella Revolution” and made the unassuming product an unofficial symbol of sorts.

Along with the yellow ribbons worn by protestors as a symbol of suffrage, the umbrella has inspired a wave of artists and illustrators to express their support for protesters on the Internet with umbrella-themed art. Artists are posting their graphics across Twitter and Instagram using the hashtags #umbrellarevolution, #HKartists and #occupyHK. There are drawings of umbrellas that double as paper cranes, umbrellas painted with peace signs, umbrellas held up by cartoon demonstrators in proud defiance.

And now Kacey Wong, an assistant professor at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, is holding a competition for designers to create an official Umbrella Revolution logo. If you’re interested, he’s accepting submissions via his Facebook page.

[h/t Creative Review]

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