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The Worst Time To Buy Weed At A Dispensary: Friday At 5 P.M.

It’s especially a madhouse the Friday before Thanksgiving.

The Worst Time To Buy Weed At A Dispensary: Friday At 5 P.M.
[Photo: Flickr user Dank Depot]

Contrary to popular belief, stoners like to plan ahead. New data finds pot consumers like to stock up on their supplies before heading into a long weekend.

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According to marijuana review site Leafly, dispensaries are busiest on three days: the unofficial marijuana holiday April 20, July 4, and the Friday before Thanksgiving (got to cope with all that family time somehow). For the rest of the year, dispensaries report the most foot traffic on Fridays and around 5 p.m. The slowest day of the week for legal pot sales is Monday.

California leads in the number of dispensaries with 1,100 locations, followed by Colorado with 550, Washington with 280, and Oregon with 200. The ZIP code with the largest number of dispensaries is 92705 (Santa Ana, California); the top area code for dispensaries is 303 (Denver).

On average, cannabis dispensaries carry about 16 strains of flower inventory–the most stocked strains being Blue Dream, Sour Diesel, and Bubba Kush. Their stock also includes an average of seven types of concentrates (a rendered, highly potent form of cannabis that can take the form of oil), 14 types of edible goods (treats such as pot brownies or candy), two types of pre-rolled joints, and three types of seeds for people to grow their own plants at home.


With growing momentum behind the legalization of marijuana for medicinal and recreational use, the industry is expected to bloom into a $10 billion market by 2018. Leafly, often hailed as the Yelp of Weed, is one of the major players pushing forward the conversation around legalization. Last month, Leafly took out a full-page ad in The New York Times, congratulating New York state for passing the Compassionate Care Act.

About the author

Based in San Francisco, Alice Truong is Fast Company's West Coast correspondent. She previously reported in Chicago, Washington D.C., New York and most recently Hong Kong, where she (left her heart and) worked as a reporter for the Wall Street Journal.

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