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This Is What Reality Shows Like “Pawn Stars” Look Like If You Remove All The Filler

By removing the glaringly inessential sections of Pawn Stars and shows of its ilk, you can reduce their runtimes by about 27 minutes.

Lately, there has been a micro-trend of showing how short sitcoms are with the jokes removed. Episodes of Seinfeld, Friends, and The Big Bang Theory run anywhere between 1:30 and 3:00 minutes when they’re strictly plot essentials. At least these shows are more or less supposed to be joke-receptacles that happen to have some plot to move them along. One can’t say the same for reality shows like Pawn Stars, where it turns out if you remove everything central to the plot of an episode, it also only runs about three minutes.

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Created by YouTubers Glorious Wig, the recent video “Pawn Stars In Exactly 3 Minutes” cuts out all the filler to just show who’s trying to sell what, why, and whether they succeed. Whatever the premise of these odd-job reality shows, most of them are padded out in order to make it seem like we’re seeing more than just some self-styled quirk-machine do his or her job. When those forced moments that attempt to amp up the stakes are removed, all that’s left is the bare bones of some sort of financial transaction.

Here’s what you’re missing if you’ve only ever tuned into this three-minute version of Pawn Stars. After the item being sold is introduced, the person trying to unload it often gives a personal testimonial about how he or she came upon it and the fact that they are trying to sell it to the stars of the program. We already know the second part–because we just saw it happen and it needs no reiteration–and the first is usually some variation of an inheritance story. Then we find out every tedious detail about the object and pawn stars Rick and Corey Harrison’s (presumed, certainly producer-supplied) personal knowledge of it.


If segments like those sound like your jam, then by all means seek out the full episodes, post-haste. And if you have a tolerance for that, perhaps consider just hanging around at a variety of goods and services exchanges in your area and watch it all go down in real time.

[h/t to Digg]