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This Documentary Examines The Ripple Effects Of San Francisco’s Tech Boom For You To Argue About More

This Documentary Examines The Ripple Effects Of San Francisco’s Tech Boom For You To Argue About More
[Image: Flickr user Marco]

Living in San Francisco, the endless stream of articles, videos, and passing commentary on the street analyzing the state of the city’s tech boom quickly becomes tiresome (The most common verdict among non-techies: It’s destroying any semblance of culture and pushing out all the interesting people, but other than that, it’s not so bad).

Amidst the sea of opinions, there has been little room for real dialogue. Golden City, a documentary project about the tech industry’s role in transforming housing and transportation in San Francisco, seeks to change this sad state of affairs.

Initial footage from the documentary can be seen on the Indiegogo fundraising video. The film aims for a sobering look at the people and places affected by the expanding tech sector. It’s about disruption–not of outdated industries, but of the stabilizing forces that have made San Francisco a welcoming place for so long, even in the face of past upheavals.

The creator of the film, a tech worker from the first dot-com boom named Walter Thompson, explains on the Indiegogo page:

I’m speaking to people who are managing the rapid pace of change: politicians, activists, urban planners, academics, real-estate developers and tech entrepreneurs. I’m also interviewing people well outside the power structure: individual tech workers, service employees, taxi and ride-sharing drivers, long-term renters, new property owners, disabled residents, musicians and artists, bicyclists… everyone who’s feeling the effects of change.

Surfacing these stories is powerful because we learn by listening to each other. I believe a locally-produced, crowdfunded documentary creates a shared frame of reference for people who’d like to add their voice to the ongoing conversation about where San Francisco is heading.

Check out the campaign page here. The goal is to raise $50,000 to produce the feature.

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