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Got A Flat On Your Bike? Not Anymore, With This 60-Second Repair Device

Cyclists can now patch their own flats without the mess and hassle of changing out the entire inner tube.

If you’ve ever been out cycling and got a flat tire, you’ll know what a hassle it is to repair. Either you have take out the whole inner tube and get dirty replacing it, or you have to traipse to a bike shop and pay someone else for the privilege (often while they sneer at you for not doing it yourself). Either way, it’s an interruption on your day off.

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Patchnride is an alternative to the standard repair kit, and, by the looks of things, a simpler, less messy one. First, you use a cloth to wipe the tire and find where the leak is. Then, after pinching the tire, you place a spiky applicator into the hole, and pull a lever backwards then forward again. That pushes a liquid rubber substance onto the inner tube. Finally, you press the tire with a finger to set the adhesive.


Alexander Deiser, who developed the device, says it fixes the problem in as little as 60 seconds. And there’s no need to take the wheel off to complete the procedure. “The patch was designed to last as long as an inner tube, and you can patch the same tire numerous times and continue riding on it,” he writes in an email.

See their marketing pitch here:

Deiser developed the device after faltering in a long-distance cycling race. “I had ridden 264 miles in a 12-hour race, was in the lead, and then suddenly I got a flat tire. I lost the lead, and subsequently lost first place because I had to stop and change the tire; it was incredibly frustrating,” he says. “This is what inspired me to look for a solution to permanently repair tubular tires on the go, no matter where you are and under any condition.”

Deiser claims the Patchnride is just as useful for hobby cyclists as racers. He also says it works with different types of tires, including tubular, mountain bike, cruiser, and stroller tires.

“We’ve also been getting a lot of excitement from people who ride alone at night. For them, changing a tire becomes a safety issue, so Patchnride gets them back on the bike quicker,” Deiser says. Also, patching tires means less old tires clogging up landfill sites.

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You can pre-order the tool, two “patch pods” and two leak detectors for $25. Shipping is scheduled for the fall.

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About the author

Ben Schiller is a New York staff writer for Fast Company. Previously, he edited a European management magazine and was a reporter in San Francisco, Prague, and Brussels.

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