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“Galaxy Getaways” Is Your Travel Guide To The Finest Destinations In Marvel’s “Guardians Of The Galaxy”

Word is the food at Gluborg’s on Xandar is the best in the galaxy.

“Galaxy Getaways” Is Your Travel Guide To The Finest Destinations In Marvel’s “Guardians Of The Galaxy”

We’ve remarked before that Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy is not the easiest film for the the studio behind Iron Man and The Avengers to market. The “Marvel” logo at the beginning of the film has earned the studio a lot of goodwill, but there’s a big difference between characters like Captain America and Iron Man and a talking superhero raccoon.

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Which makes the way Guardians is being marketed fascinating to watch: when your audience isn’t sure that they want what you’re selling, how do you convince them that the adventures of Star-Lord and Groot are going to be as exciting as the battles of the Hulk and Thor?


The latest answer to that question is a new in-world website created for Guardians called “Galaxy Getaways,” which offers a ground-level (using Google Street View, naturally) glimpse of the worlds that Star-Lord, Rocket Raccoon, Groot, Gamora, and Drax the Destroyer will be visiting in the course of their adventure.

In-world film marketing is having a good year–the Mockingjay campaign continues apace–and it’s interesting to see how it’s being used here to familiarize fans with concepts that are probably outside of their base of knowledge (one would have to be a serious Marvel Zombie to recognize the planet of Xandar, for example).

In the “Galaxy Getaways” campaign, a travel agency urges you to leave behind locations like Hawaii, Tahiti, and the Bahamas–because they look like s*** compared to the destinations available throughout the galaxy, with “six star” luxuries and intergalactic Nova Corps police. The site deploys Google Streetview to allow visitors to explore the caves of Morag, or the grimy city streets of Knowhere, and offers restaurant and culture tips. Guardians of the Galaxy may still be a risk from Marvel, but they’re clearly invested in making sure that interested fans have seen the world they’re building from as many angles as possible.

About the author

Dan Solomon lives in Austin with his wife and his dog. He's written about music for MTV and Spin, sports for Sports Illustrated, and pop culture for Vulture and the AV Club.

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