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Indie Rock Band Spoon Want To Reward Vinyl Customers With Digital-Style Instant Gratification

Actually physically dragging your carcass to a record store is a lot of work in this digital age, but there are perks for the bold.

Indie Rock Band Spoon Want To Reward Vinyl Customers With Digital-Style Instant Gratification
Spoon They Want My Soul

The sort of indie music artists that were raised on weekly Tuesday trips to the record store (that’s when the new albums come out, youngster) and meticulously collecting of their favorite bands’ vinyl albums and CDs are also the sort of bands that find themselves frequently trying to promote their new releases by hyping digital downloads. In that way, after all, they’re only human–and digital is where the business is. That means that people who grew up in record stores are now likely to be selling pre-orders of their digital releases by promising fans the instant gratification of an advance download of a single or two the second they click the “buy” button.

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The indie rockers in Spoon, though, decided to take a different tack when selling pre-orders of their eighth album, They Want My Soul. Instead of an immediate download of a single for digital pre-orders, they’re offering fans who buy vinyl copies of their new album at a local, independent record store some decidedly analog gratification. That comes in the form of a 10-inch single, with three new tracks, made available immediately for pre-orders placed after July 15, three weeks before the album’s release.

Spoon frontman Britt Daniel explains in a press release his thinking behind the concept he’s calling “vinyl gratification”:

“Why do we incentivize people to buy our music from big outlets but we don’t extend the same courtesy to actual record stores? Case in point: why do we encourage listeners to buy early by offering “instant gratification” tracks for pre-orders of the digital album, yet there’s no special motivation for buying music from Waterloo or Reckless Records? And there’s no incentive to buy the format that so many of those listeners prefer–an actual physical item they can hold and read and play on a turntable.”

The 10-inch record–which will come in a plain white sleeve, to enable the band to rush the records to market–will be available in 150 different record stores throughout the U.S. Basically, if you can go there on Record Store Day, you can probably score a copy of the single when you pre-order your copy of They Want My Soul.

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About the author

Dan Solomon lives in Austin with his wife and his dog. He's written about music for MTV and Spin, sports for Sports Illustrated, and pop culture for Vulture and the AV Club

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