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Startup Tinker Tailor Lets You Customize Designer Clothing

You’re in charge: Tweak hemlines, add sleeves, change colorways on designer duds, or make a custom design.

Remember that dress you almost loved? If only it were longer, or had sleeves, or came in a different fabric. Tinker Tailor, a startup headed by Icelandic fashion investor (and one of Fast Company‘s Most Creative People) Aslaug Magnusdottir, lets you customize designer clothes through its digital platform, using 3-D tools.

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The month-old company, whose advisory board includes Leandra Medine (of the Man Repeller blog), stylist Melanie Ward, and the fashion consultant Yasmin Sewell, has just opened its New York headquarters in Hell’s Kitchen, reports The Cut.


Part of Magnusdottir’s motivation for founding Tinker Tailor was a desire to offer more modest versions of designer clothes for women in conservative cultures–by adding longer sleeves or higher necklines. “I have had interactions with a lot of Middle Eastern women who have expressed interest in unique items, but also need to be able to respect their culture and dress appropriately for that,” she says.

Using 3-D design tools online, you can modify existing garments by 80 designers, including Vivienne Westwood, Marchesa, Rodarte, and Giambattista Valli. (Designers tell Tinker Tailor which elements of their pieces can be customized.) You can also design your own Tinker Tailor-branded piece, with custom fabrics and silhouettes. Unlike an analog tailor, Tinker Tailor’s tool lets you see what the garment will look like once it’s finished.


Tinker Tailor marks a savvy shift to customization in an age of online shopping sprawl. Between flash sales sites, curated shops, and the assorted online offerings of brick-and-mortar stores, shopping on the web can feel as overwhelming as it is deeply impersonal. With Tinker Tailor, customers get to feel special, and part of the process–in its own way, it’s luxury dabbling in DIY. Magnusdottir believes this sort of customization is the future of fashion, and that in the world of homogenous fast-fashion, people crave designs that express their individuality.

[H/T The Cut]

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About the author

Carey Dunne is a Brooklyn-based writer covering art and design. Follow her on Twitter.

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