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New Video Games Based On NASA Tech Change Gameplay Based On How Stressed You Are

New Video Games Based On NASA Tech Change Gameplay Based On How Stressed You Are
[Image: Hal, 2001: A Space Odyssey]

Promising NASA technology rarely stays cooped up at the agency. Over the years, NASA research has spun off into innumerable commercial applications, including everything from better artificial limb technology to improved water purification systems.

On June 17, NASA teamed up with innovation platform Edison Nation to launch a call for ideas on what to do with one of the agency’s more intriguing technologies: Mindshift, a platform that changes the input to a simulation or video game based on the user’s physiological state.

Developed by NASA scientists Alan Pope and Chad Stephens, Mindshift was originally used for pilot and astronaut training. But the applications go far beyond the merely practical. “We think it’s the next big thing in video games,” says Pope.

The technology uses physiological sensors to measure muscle tension, heart rate, and brain wave activity. Based on what a player is feeling–if they’re stressed or losing their concentration, for example–Mindshift can adjust the game’s response to help them focus or make them less stressed.

Here’s a video game demo of the technology in action:

“In terms of applications, we’re looking for places where this can be deployed as a form of entertainment and also training. There are a number of situations where someone could be trained using a video game-like task,” says Pope. “It could be sharpshooters in the military, surgeons who would need to control their attention and anxiety–any kind of task that puts pressure on someone while they’re performing the task with their hands or manually.”

Edison Nation is crowdsourcing ideas for Mindshift licensing opportunities until August 4. Winners will share royalties from commercialization of their product with NASA.AS