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“Invisible” Cabin Reflects Scottish Park’s Raw Beauty

Now you can reflect in a reflective setting, in this mirrored lookout in the Scottish highlands.

Truly invisible housing would have to involve crazy high-tech metamaterials and/or actual magic, but a beautiful and much easier simulacrum can be created using a simple trick: old-fashioned mirrors.

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That’s how architecture students Angus Ritchie and Daniel Tyler handled the problem of conserving the view when they designed and constructed this Lookout box in a Scottish national park. The goal: to watch nature. (That’s a pretty fine goal.) Their budget was less than $7,000, and the project came from the Scottish Scenic Routes Initiative and the park itself.

The duo constructed the cube from birch ply, stainless steel, and hardwood. The entryway into the cube itself is open–the cubes, essentially cut-outs, face outwards at a 90 degree angle from each other. Bench seating is inside.

Located in Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park, the “invisible” (mirrored) structure is simple and unintrusive. It’s not, however, the first we’ve seen. This barn, in Long Island City’s Socrates Park, makes similarly impressive use of a mirrored design. But the Scottish cabin is, frankly, in the middle of nowhere and has stunningly dramatic views of the surrounding lochs–and that counts for a lot.

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About the author

Dan Nosowitz is a freelance writer and editor who has written for Popular Science, The Awl, Gizmodo, Fast Company, BuzzFeed, and elsewhere. He holds an undergraduate degree from McGill University and currently lives in Brooklyn, because he has a beard and glasses and that's the law

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