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A Kickstarter Attempts To Raise $6 Million To Buy–And Destroy–The Only Copy Of Wu-Tang’s New Album

Shame on a Kickstarter who tries to run game on a Kickstarter.

A Kickstarter Attempts To Raise $6 Million To Buy–And Destroy–The Only Copy Of Wu-Tang’s New Album

The Wu-Tang Clan got headlines earlier this year when they announced that their new album, rather than being released as a piece of commercial art for fans of the group’s work to, you know, listen to would instead be released into the fine art world: The legendary Staten Island rap collective would put its Once Upon A Time In Shaolin out as a one-of-a-kind original that would only exist as a single copy, thereby establishing the value of music in an age where it’s been continually undervalued, and making a bold statement against the perception of music as infinitely-reproduceable commodity.

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Or something. The pretension inherent in that idea has alienated at least one big fan of the Wu, who’s launched a Kickstarter for a “performance art” project of his own: Namely, to destroy the only copy of the Wu Tang Clan’s new album. Chris Everhart of Fredericksburg, Virginia, who started the campaign, writes that, “I will happily destroy this album in public spectacle and never listen to it. I have listened to this group since I was able to pick an album from the CD rack. But these m&%f$#s done went to far,” he says, adding that, “There will be a destruction ceremony that will be broadcast live via the intertubes. This ceremony will serve as a work of performance art. It will be scripted, filmed for posterity, and made available for download worldwide.”

That helps him satisfy the “public art” criteria required to be approved by Kickstarter–but in order to actually obtain the one-of-a-kind piece, which will likely be the subject to a fairly intense bidding war, Everhart has set his Kickstarter goal appropriately high: He aims to raise a minimum of $6,000,000 to ensure that the copy lands next to his stick of dynamite, and not in the vault of some asshole who can’t even tell you what “C.R.E.A.M.” stands for. At the moment, the campaign only has a little over $200 in its coffers, which leaves them still $5,999,800 or so shy of their goal–which should, ultimately, be little surprise, as most people who feel passionate enough about the self-righteous, self-enriching stunt from the RZA and friends to protest are probably also people who are keenly aware of one of the group’s very first public statements: Namely, that the Wu-Tang Clan ain’t nuthin’ to fuck wit’.

About the author

Dan Solomon lives in Austin with his wife and his dog. He's written about music for MTV and Spin, sports for Sports Illustrated, and pop culture for Vulture and the AV Club.

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