advertisement
advertisement

Hear What James Franco, Hans Zimmer, Tracey Emin, Moby, And Others Have To Say About Creativity

Nearly two-dozen artists address the nature of creativity in the short film Inspiring Creativity, produced by arts and culture organization Liberatum and sponsored by illy.

Inspiring Creativity, a short film produced by arts and culture organization Liberatum, finds a mix of talents from the worlds of art, music, film, design, modeling, and photography musing about their lives as creative people and what inspires them.

advertisement

The film covers some familiar ground, but it’s fascinating to hear such a broad range of creative luminaries break down the nature of creativity and inspiration and hear common themes emerge from the divergent perspectives. While filmmaker Mark Romanek confesses that he finds slightly more inspiration in music than he does in cinema, designer Karim Rashid talks about how all human beings instinctively want to create. James Franco, actor, writer, director and, more recently, social media provocateur, allows us to observe him painting a portrait of a co-star during a break while shooting a movie, and musician Moby bemoans what he views as a modern-day culture in which people are content at just being good enough at something rather than being masters of their crafts.

Liberatum founder Pablo Ganguli, who co-directed the film with Tomas Auksas, says he has always been curious about artists and their lives, and when Italian coffee company illy, which sponsored the short, initially approached Liberatum about collaborating on a project, “It seemed like a great occasion to create a film about what creativity really meant to leading artists of our time from different disciplines and understand what drove them.”


Ganguli and Auksas shot Inspiring Creativity in just three weeks, scoring interviews with the aforementioned talents as well TED founder Richard Saul Wurman, director Lee Daniels, and Klaus Biesenback, director of MoMA PS1, among others. “We wanted the film to truly celebrate the world of the arts, and, therefore having a mix of creative figures from different art forms was vital,” Ganguli says, noting, “Some of them we knew from previous Liberatum programs but most we had not collaborated with before, so it was an exciting venture.”

While everyone has a point to make, Ganguli says that he and Auksas were most deeply moved by what Tracey Emin, a British artist known for her confessional works, had to say about missing out on love because of her devotion to art. “It was poignant the fact that she would rather work and dedicate her life entirely to creativity than to fall in love,” Ganguli says.

advertisement
advertisement

About the author

Christine Champagne is a New York City-based journalist best known for covering creativity in television and film, interviewing the talent in front of the camera and behind-the-scenes. She has written for outlets including Emmy, Variety, VanityFair.com, Redbook, Time Out New York and TVSquad.com

More