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Net Neutrality Bus Shelter Ads Tell The FCC That The Internet Is Watching

Net Neutrality Bus Shelter Ads Tell The FCC That The Internet Is Watching

If you’re not concerned about Net Neutrality, you probably don’t know what it is. But the people with the most to lose are people who live much of their every day lives on the Internet–and whose livelihoods are linked to the free, equal flow of information through the series of tubes that the FCC is considering deregulating by doing away with Net Neutrality in its current form.


There are plenty of places online to get more information about what Net Neutrality means, what it does, and how the proposed changes would impact ordinary Internet users. But there aren’t as many opportunities to get that information at a bus shelter near the FCC’s headquarters in Washington DC.

That’s something that Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian sought to change and, with the help of $20,000 in crowdfunded donations (including two grand worth of Dogecoins), he has: In DC now, there are over two dozen bright red bus shelter ads that warn commuters that the journey to their favorite websites might soon be as convoluted and overcrowded as their trip on the DC Metro.

The ads offer an outline of the DC Metro’s route map, with the stops replaced by websites–Netflix at Rosslyn, Reddit at Fort Totten, etc–and warns that “Internet providers are creating gridlock and new fees between you and your destination,” with a number for the FCC at the bottom of the page and a call to action. It’s unlikely that FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler spends much time on the bus, but maybe the 2.7 million travelers that Ohanian says he expects to see the ads will make him aware that they’d rather not have to commute from WashingtonPost.com to Amazon.

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