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“Please Use This Song” Sounds Like Every Song In Every Ad, Intentionally

Jon Lajoie of TV’s The League makes a convincing case that every song used in commercials sounds the same, with a song begging to be put in a commercial.

Once upon a time, the biggest sell-out move that a band could make was licensing one of their hits to be used in a commercial. It now seems like a quaint, naive, long ago era. These days, there is a quiet agreement between bands and fans that everybody has to put food on their plates somehow and there is much less begrudging of corporate interaction. The focus in advertising music criticism has since shifted to the saturation-level of trend cycles. The days of dub step seem to be dwindling, but do you remember just how widespread the wub-wub was? What seems to have taken its place is the safe sound of songs like the one Jon Lajoie just released, which is both literally and figuratively begging to be used in an ad.

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“Please Use This Song” is catchy, but that’s a given. It’s goal seems to be to show how catchiness can be rather insidious and calculated. There’s a certain cynicism behind those soaring choruses and handclaps, which seems specifically designed for maximum consumption. Lajoie, the goofball musician known to most for his role on The League, has crafted a number that will stick in your head every bit as much as the Sara Bareilles-type songs it is mocking.

Aside from the chorus, which plaintively asks you to consider using the song in any ad for monetary purposes, the first verse rattles off a list of what kind of ads it might be used in–fast food franchise, dating websites, you name it. The drums, shirts, and other objects in the video are decorated with a Your Brand Here insignia, while we see imagery that at first looks pulled straight out of an ad, until the song gets a bit crazier. At the center of it all, though, is a lonely guy watching TV in a dark room, highlighting the ironic end user of all such chipper advertising tunes.


Please weigh in below in the comments on whether Lajoie nailed it or really nailed it.

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