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The Amazing Spider-Man Meets The Amazing Baby Spider-Man In Evian’s Latest Baby & Me Ad

The brand continues its long-running viral campaign by teaming up with a movie blockbuster.

The Amazing Spider-Man Meets The Amazing Baby Spider-Man In Evian’s Latest Baby & Me Ad
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If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Just add a superhero.

That’s what Evian and agency BETC Paris have done for the latest edition of the brand’s long-running campaign of viral baby videos. It started with roller-skating babies, then led to some breakdancing, and then morphed into “Baby & Me” featuring adults looking at mirror images of their much younger selves.


Now the campaign is back with a superhero version of “Baby & Me,” starring your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man. At first Spidey doesn’t believe what he’s seeing, but soon joins his diminutive reflection in some sweet dance-web combo moves to the familiar Hotstepper remix. Obviously Peter Parker was one of the 74 million people who saw the first spot last year.


As brand tie-ins go, The Amazing Spider-Man 2–which hits theatres in May–could do worse than associating with a sequel to one of the most viewed online ads ever. BETC Paris chairman and global creative director Remi Babinet says the opportunity to bring the two together was enough to change the brand’s schedule. “Evian usually brings out a new film every two years but the brand wanted to take on this partnership with Sony,” says Babinet. “Since Spider-Man represents so many of the same characteristics of Evian’s vision–curiosity, energy, and a zest for life–it was natural for us to take advantage of this partnership and combine the two to have him reconnecting with his inner baby.”


BETC executive creative director Filip Nilsson says there was some pressure to follow up the massive popularity of the original baby hit, but the creatives didn’t let it get to them. “The last film had 130 million views, if you count all different platforms, so when you start working it feels like an incredibly high mountain to climb,” says Nilsson. “Key words for us are ‘fun’ and ‘charming.’ It sounds a bit banal, but it’s really what we’re looking for. If you try too hard, there’s a big risk that you’re going to lose both of them so I think the challenge is to try to keep, even if expectations are high, and you feel under pressure, to keep a light touch on the subject and try not to become too serious. That’s what we’re trying to do.”

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About the author

Jeff Beer is a staff editor at Fast Company, covering advertising, marketing, and brand creativity. He lives in Toronto.

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