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Damn, New York! Check Out Real NYC Style On The Streets During Fashion Week

Photographer Ruddy Roye has taken over our Instagram, filling it with stunning street style.

While fashion week unfolds at Lincoln Center next year’s trends are being created on the streets. Brooklyn-based photographer Ruddy Roye has been capturing the street style innovators walking the asphalt runways of New York’s five boroughs and spilling out of the “tents” during Fashion Week–and sharing it all via our Instagram feed.

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Roye, a photojournalist and self-described “Instagram activist,” has been capturing people on the streets of New York for years, often showing his followers a look at the city they might not otherwise see.

In addition to shooting portraits of New Yorkers, Roye has captured the style of the Congolese “Sapeurs” and Jamaican dancehall culture. He took over The New Yorker’s Instagram feed in October of 2012 with his images taken during Hurricane Sandy.

“Photography,” says Roye, “is finding a piece of me in the eyes or essence of everyone and everything I photograph. It has always been a collaborative effort. I think if you are true to the thing that motivates you, then you can stimulate that in the things and people you are trying to get it from. Like everything has its reflection.”

Did anything surprise him about shooting the people of Fashion Week? “I think seeing how a city can galvanize and come together always fascinates me. Like natural disasters, like around 9/11, I find solace in the fact that it is something we can still do. I just can’t wait to see us do the same around poverty, homelessness, hunger and a host of other social ills.”

Follow Fast Company’s Instagram feed to see Roye’s images of New York style and contribute your own looks by tagging your photos with #RealStyleNY.

In the gallery above, see the amazing images–and stories– of self-styled fashionistas captured by Roye’s lens.

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Proverbs Taylor: “Fashion is the way you express yourself. It is a way of making connections with garments. Whether it is something pricey from an established designer or a hoodie from the hood, even the controversial fur, clothes and fashion expresses a feeling that can inspire my music.”

About the author

Teressa Iezzi is the editor of Co.Create. She was previously the editor of Advertising Age’s Creativity, covering all things creative in the brand world.

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