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These Incredibly Suggestive Pictures Of Literal Food Porn Are Totally Safe For Work

Nice melons!

Ever wonder why some vegetables seem oddly erotic? Perhaps it’s because, in the words of the marketers behind Montreal’s controversial food porn ad campaign, sex and food are the only two subjects that engage all five senses.

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The photos, which display un-retouched food as human body parts, are part of a campaign for alternative biweekly Voir’s annual food guide. Dreamed up by Publicis Montreal, the concept comes from a celebration of the guide’s 18 years of existence, which, har har…you know, age of consent for online pornography.


“There’s a big food porn trend here,” Nicolas Massey, vice president of Publicis Montreal, says. “In our top 20 bestsellers, 14 of them are restaurant books. We thought about the 18 and older [idea], and taking food and translating it into organic forms. Everyone thought of an oyster.”

Massey hired fashion photographer couple Leda and Pierre St. Jacques to take the pictures. Only a few made it to the final cut. Some, like the representation of sperm as a splash of 2% cream on Plexiglas, will never see the light of day.

“The picture that I prefer is the meat penis, because I like the wire that the food stylist put on it. I think it’s very funny, because for me it’s like castration,” Leda St. Jacques explains. “Here in Quebec, I think it’s the same thing in New York, the women are so strong. [Men] don’t quite know how to deal with us because we’re so strong; we’re very emancipated.”


St. Jacques also envisioned the setup as extremely simple, without any Photoshop, which some now criticize.

“People are not used to seeing pictures that are not retouched,” the fashion photographer says. “When you look at steak, it looks like the penis steak that we did. A lot of people don’t like that. It was not supposed to be beautiful: A steak is a steak.”

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Clearly, sex sells. Still, it’s rare that we get to see female parts given such realistic treatment, even in gustatory form. The campaign, both literally and figuratively cheeky, celebrates hedonism and unprocessed organics.

“For the vagina, it was very difficult to do it with food, no? We laugh a lot on set, for sure,” St. Jacques says.

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About the author

Sydney Brownstone is a Seattle-based former staff writer at Co.Exist. She lives in a Brooklyn apartment with windows that don’t quite open, and covers environment, health, and data.

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