advertisement
advertisement

With “Project Sunlight,” Unilever Asks New Parents To Imagine A Better Future

From the people who brought you Dove “Real Beauty Sketches,” a new project that encourages the sharing of optimistic stories.

With “Project Sunlight,” Unilever Asks New Parents To Imagine A Better Future
advertisement

If you’re pregnant and take even a few seconds to consider the war, famine, and environmental desecration of the planet, you might question the logic of bringing a child into the world. You certainly would not expect a multinational corporation to bring all these horrible realities to the attention of parents on Universal Children’s Day. But Unilever has.

The company has invited expecting parents to view a film by award-winning director Errol Morris, demonstrating both the horrors of the modern world–and the many reasons to hope for a brighter future. As one of the fathers-to-be says in the spot, “The world needs more good guys and I’d like to think that our baby will be one of the good guys.”


Unilever also, apparently, wants to be one of the good guys and to prove it, it’s launched Project Sunlight, a campaign that includes an online portal that explores the social missions of Unilever brands around the globe and invites consumers, especially parents, to share their own their own stories about improving health, education, and the environment.


Unilever is partnering with groups like Save the Children and UNICEF and as part of the campaign will create 2 million “acts of sunshine”–things like supplying school meals, drinking water, and improved hygiene to kids around the world.

Project Sunlight was created by David/Ogilvy & Mather (and the same creative group that was responsible for Dove’s “Real Beauty Sketches”) and is an extension of Unilever’s multi-year sustainability initiative–the company has pledged to improve the health of a billion people, use only sustainable raw materials, and cut the environmental impact of 1,600 products in half. This means Q-tips made from the wood of sustainable forests and shampoo brands which urge consumers to take shorter showers. Unilever has also promised to double its revenue by 2020. That may seem like an impossible feat, but it’s nothing compared to raising a child.

advertisement
advertisement

About the author

Jennifer Miller is the author of The Year of the Gadfly (Harcourt, 2012) and Inheriting The Holy Land (Ballantine, 2005). She's a regular contributor to Co.Create.

More