The Recommender: Jessica Hullinger, Founder/Editor-In-Chief/Ace Reporter At "The Hullinger News"

Assistant News Editor Jess Hullinger has been making news since she was in elementary school.

Name: Jessica Hullinger
Role at Fast Company: Assistant News Editor, Digital
Twitter: @JessHullinger
Titillating fact: As a kid, I was dead set on a career in journalism. In 5th grade, I started my own family newspaper, The Hullinger News. I produced it on an old typewriter I found in my grandparents' house. My journalistic integrity was lacking (I often quoted myself, and fabricated quotes from family members), but you have to give me credit for the hand-drawn art.



Things she's loving:

1. What America will look like when the ice caps melt
Goodbye, Florida. So long, New Jersey. Sorry I never got to visit you, Denmark. National Geographic has an awesome interactive feature detailing the future of the planet's coastal regions, if global temperatures continue on their current trajectory. "That could take a very long time (thousands of years, even)," notes The Washington Post's Dylan Matthews, "but if we keep emitting like we’ve been, the results are drastic." Check out the images.

2. Rand Paul's latest plagiarism accusations
The U.S. Senator has been accused of stealing other people's work for a while, but this week, the debacle hit close to home. Buzzfeed's Andrew Kaczyinski did some digging, and discovered that one of Paul's recent op-eds for the Washington Times appeared to have been ripped, almost verbatim, from a story written by Dan Stewart, a senior editor at The Week magazine (full disclosure: Dan is my partner). All week, Dan has been receiving messages lauding him with praise, though he did very little aside from write an exceptionally great guide to the downfalls of mandatory sentencing laws. I found his response to the incident, in which he explains his indifference to being plagiarized, to be a thoughtful reflection on the changing world of journalism and online content ownership:

I'm indifferent to being plagiarized because today's media environment has changed what it means to have ownership of a piece of writing. Once your words are published online, they become part of the currency of the internet. They can be freely woven into others' articles, quoted at length, or tweeted without context. None of us can afford to be that sensitive about how others use or abuse our work.

It's worth reading the rest.

3. The desert memorial site for a 1989 plane crash, spotted on Google Earth
In 1989, Flight 772 was headed from Brazzaville in the Republic of Congo to Paris when a bomb on board exploded, plunging the plane into the Sahara desert. All 170 people on board were killed. To honor the victims, their families hauled thousands of dark stones out to the desert and used them to form an incredible memorial which can be seen from miles above.

4. Time calculated how much money Twitter owes you
Twitter launched its IPO on Thursday, and, as Time puts it, "more than a few of the social network’s 230 million users have noticed their tweets are making other people rich." They created an interactive tool that lets you calculate how much your Twitter handle is worth. @JessHullinger is worth a measly $273, but @FastCompany is owed $727,523. I've been enjoying Time's other recent interactive tools, like this U.S. mood map.

[Top Image: Alexander Hardin]

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