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A Stylish Smart Wristband That Women Might Actually Want To Wear

MEMI has a very specific focus: to notify wearers of important calls, text messages, and calendar events sent from the people they want to hear from.

MEMI is a smart device worn on the wrist, but it doesn’t track steps, heart rate, sleep, or anything else for that matter. It has a very narrow focus: to filter through the diversions of smartphones while ensuring people don’t miss notifications they care about. The smart bracelet buzzes to notify wearers of calls, text messages, and calendar events from the people they want to hear from.

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“I was hitting a real frustration point either with always missing calls or being distracted by having my phone out,” cofounder Leslie Pierson told Fast Company. MEMI, which launched Thursday on Kickstarter, is seeking to raise $100,000 to go into production. The Bluetooth device, which has no screen, can be customized so wearers only receive alerts from certain individuals. MEMI has three distinct vibrations that are assigned for different types of alerts, which users can silence by double tapping the bracelet.

In designing a wearable, Pierson and cofounder Margaux Guerard didn’t want yet another sporty band, choosing instead to create a bracelet that women could wear in their day-to-day lives.

“We deliberately went after a more fashionable product,” Guerard said. While she admired the aesthetics of the Jawbone Up and Nike FuelBand, these fitness trackers stood out in the office or at dinner, she said. “We felt that most of the options out there were unisex at best and didn’t take into account what women wanted to incorporate into their fashionable wardrobes,” she added.

While the founders don’t expect to add sensors or other functionality to MEMI, they said they’d like to create a version for men down the line, adding they’ve received interest for such a product.

About the author

Based in San Francisco, Alice Truong is Fast Company's West Coast correspondent. She previously reported in Chicago, Washington D.C., New York and most recently Hong Kong, where she (left her heart and) worked as a reporter for the Wall Street Journal.

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