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The Most Influential Women in Technology 2011 – Nichole Goodyear

Founder and CEO, Brickfish

The Most Influential Women in Technology 2011 – Nichole Goodyear

In the social media arena, there are loads of social media gurus, evangelists, experts, and strategists–many of them under-qualified, but terribly enthusiastic. And then there’s Nichole Goodyear. Her resume is packed with the kind of experience that warrants true social media cred. A serial entrepreneur, with several successful technology startups under her belt, she also has educational, point-of-sale, multimedia, and Internet and viral platform tech in her toolkit. And five years ago she co-founded Brickfish to help brands better connect with consumers during challenging market conditions.

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Creating more than 450 campaigns for the likes of Nike, Estee Lauder, Microsoft, Intuit, and others, Brickfish has generated over 10,000 unique URLS with 10 million unique engagers. And while Goodyear is proud of being a leader in the space, even receiving a registered trademark for cost per engagement, where advertisers only pay when a user engages with their branded content, she sees bigger challenges ahead in getting standards established for the social media ecosystem. That’s why, in addition to helming Brickfish, she’s a member of the IAB’s Social Media Committee, and chair for the industry’s first-ever Social Media Buyer’s Guide. Goodyear also sits on the Board for the Social Media Advertising Consortium (SMAC).

Gone are the days when a company plunks down a lump sum for a TV spot or banner ad, Goodyear says. And setting up a Facebook page does not a social media strategy make. “If we look at digital media, we need to create a buying economy around social media. There has to be a way to track, and measure, and buy.”

This year Brickfish put some of these concepts into practice. Goodyear gushes about the really tight integration of Facebook brand pages with company Web sites, translating platforms into Spanish and Portuguese to target two key demographics, and tapping the potential of mobile’s capability. She’s particularly excited about the mobile market and location-based functionality, “so we can scale the business in a new way across tons of brands and agencies.” Mobile social media is fundamentally changing everything about how a company works. “It’s a profound shift beyond ‘how many people did I reach,'” says Goodyear.

With tools to integrate consumers into an entire business from customer relations to products and services, the sky is apparently the limit. But Goodyear stresses, “I would say we’ve come a long way. But not far enough. We’re at the beginning of definite organization, but it’s such a complex animal.”

About the author

Lydia Dishman is a reporter writing about the intersection of tech, leadership, and innovation. She is a regular contributor to Fast Company and has written for CBS Moneywatch, Fortune, The Guardian, Popular Science, and the New York Times, among others.

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