[1] Puzz
From Arzu Studio Hope
For nine years, Chicago-based Arzu has employed Afghan women to weave hand-knotted rugs, training hundreds of craftspeople along the way. Now Arzu is shifting away from traditional patterns: The new Masters collection sourced designs from the likes of Michael Graves, Zaha Hadid, and Frank Gehry (whose design is shown here). ($12,000, arzustudiohope.org)

[2] Drawstring Lamp
From Design Stories
After a fruitless search for small-scale manufacturers in their native Goeteborg, Sweden, Kerstin Sylwan and Jenny Stefansdotter found a match: a job-training organization run by the government that specializes in artisan workshops for unemployed Swedes. Plus, the lampshades are made from material donated by a nearby textile company. ($450, merry-go-round.se)

[3] Ikono Chair
From Bernhardt
The American furniture company Bernhardt has become a champion of El Salvador's nascent design community. It began six years ago by sponsoring a design competition there; now it's also teaming up with a collective of local craftspeople and producers called Carrot Concept, which helped make this chair. ($1,000, bernhardtdesign.com)

[3] Ikono Chair
From Bernhardt
The American furniture company Bernhardt has become a champion of El Salvador's nascent design community. It began six years ago by sponsoring a design competition there; now it's also teaming up with a collective of local craftspeople and producers called Carrot Concept, which helped make this chair. ($1,000, bernhardtdesign.com)

Fast Company

3 Products That Stoke Demand For Global Artisans

When companies say they're sustainable, they're usually talking about the environment. But conscious consumers are also weighing social impact. These brands provide good jobs to artisans near and far, stoking a global market for their traditional skills.

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