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Skullcandy’s New “Supreme Sound” Headphones Shifts Its Focus Back To Music

Skullcandy used to be a fashion statement–although that statement seemed to say “I’m a loud teenager!” This headphone mainstay was flashy and heavy on neon. But in the past few years, consumers have been drawn to high-end competitors with signature sounds (such as the bass-heavy Beats by Dr. Dre), and Skullcandy realized its product was all show. So it built an in-house engineering team–previously, all this work was farmed out–to maximize airflow and enrich the audio.

Skullcandy’s New “Supreme Sound” Headphones Shifts Its Focus Back To Music
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Skullcandy used to be a fashion statement–although that statement seemed to say “I’m a loud teenager!” This headphone mainstay was flashy and heavy on neon. But in the past few years, consumers have been drawn to high-end competitors with signature sounds (such as the bass-heavy Beats by Dr. Dre), and Skullcandy realized its product was all show. So it built an in-house engineering team–previously, all this work was farmed out–to maximize airflow and enrich the audio. The new line now boasts a branded Supreme Sound. “We’ve strengthened the diaphragm of the headphone to smooth out high frequencies,” says chief merchandising officer Dan Levine. In a market catering to audio geeks, he wants Skullcandy’s statement to be heard, not just seen. ($150, skullcandy.com)

About the author

Margaret Rhodes is a former associate editor for Fast Company magazine.

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