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Knife Manufacturer WMF Makes A Sharp Point With HTML5

Knife Manufacturer WMF Makes A Sharp Point With HTML5

We’ve seen a lot of interesting uses of HTML5 before, but McCann Thailand is calling its ad for WMF Knives the first HTML5 banner. And yes, this first cut just might be the deepest.

It’s an ad that’s come a long, long way from the days of penny-cutting demonstrations. A stream of copy scrolls across a grey background to inform viewers that today’s chefs are web-savvy info-junkies who get their recipes and presumably their knife-intel from various websites.

Soon, a United Colors of Benetton-style diverse group of cartoon chef-heads appear, with various blogs on the brain in the form of thought bubbles. “We know that 80% of our customers decide to purchase once they’ve tried WMF knives,” the copy claims. At this point, you should be writhing in your seat in anticipation of finding out how the company virtually put knives in the hands of techie chefs. Is it robots? HTML5-powered robots?

No, it turns out the agency equipped the banners on several chef-frequented websites with a dazzling HTML5-assisted overhaul that allows users to control an onscreen knife. Curious chefs could simply click on the enormous slab of beef spread out across the banner, and watch the blade cut through not only the beef, but also the banner itself, and the web browser beneath it. Each cut is accompanied by the sobering sound of briskly scraped metal usually signaling that a sword has been unsheathed.

While the demonstration may be more symbolic of “cutting through the online clutter” than “easily prepping a rack of lamb for an entree,” apparently the campaign was a success, with WMF sales volume increasing (sharply) by 15%.JB