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Highlights of the Issue: June 2010

cite {display:none !important;} .timestamp {display:none !important;} June 1, 2010 The 100 Most Creative People in Business For 2010 From Google to Gaga, Apple to architecture, Facebook to fashion, Fast Company counts down the most influential and surprising executives, artists, and impresarios crafting our culture-and our future.

June 1, 2010

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The 100 Most Creative People in Business For 2010

From Google to Gaga, Apple to architecture, Facebook to fashion,
Fast Company counts down the most influential and surprising executives, artists,
and impresarios crafting our culture-and our future.

New York, May 26, 2010 – Fast Company’s second annual ranking of The 100 Most Creative People in Business (page 76) excludes anyone featured in the magazine in the past, including all 2009 honorees. The result is a whole new class of on-the-rise creatives, from Asia to Africa, Europe to the Americas.

“The selections we’ve made reflect the breadth of new ideas and new pursuits at play in our business landscape,” explains editor Robert Safian. They are people like cover subject Soraya Darabi (page 96), who dragged The New York Times into the age of social media; Patrick Awuah, who founded Ashesi University in Ghana; Franklin Leonard of Universal Pictures, whose Black List has spawned multiple Oscars; and White House CTO Beth Simone Noveck, who’s bringing transparency into government. Featured in the top 10:

  1. Lady Gaga. The music phenom cultivates her brand with near-military rigor-wooing not just fans but also execs from Polaroid to HP.
  2. Eddy Cue. Steve Jobs may hold the limelight, but it’s Cue who led the creation of iTunes and the App Store.
  3. Elizabeth Warren. The chair for the Congressional Oversight Panel is pushing to make consumer financial protection a reality.
  4. Shiro Nakamura. Nissan’s design chief is ready to wow the world with the first global mass-market electric car, due later this year.
  5. Ryan Murphy. His idiosyncratic vision is behind the wildly successful Glee.
  6. Steve Burd. The Safeway chief is injecting new ideas for health reform into corporate America.
  7. Chris Anderson. He’s transformed TED, the ideafest that attracts luminaries in technology, entertainment, and design, from mere conference to cultural juggernaut.
  8. Hannah Jones. She’s helping make Nike a leader in sustainability.
  9. James Cameron. In a word, Avatar.
  10. Qi Lu. The Bing chief is overcoming entrenched regimes at Microsoft to provide a spark.

For the rest of the list and rich multimedia profiles of the 100 Most Creative People in Business, go to www.fastcompany.com beginning Wednesday, May 26. The June issue of Fast Company is on newsstands beginning June 1.

OTHER HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE JUNE 2010 ISSUE:

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Why World Cup Soccer Is the Best Business in Sports, page 28
Comparing the numbers on the Tour de France, Super Bowl, Olympics, and more.

The Idea Lab, page 42
At Stanford University’s new d.school, every space is designed to help capture ideas.

Bring Back Bill Gates, page 48
Our tech columnist, Farhad Manjoo, says Steve Ballmer has steered Microsoft in the wrong direction-and argues Bill Gates should be restored to the helm.

The Canned Lion Awards, page 54
We unveil our nominees for the most egregious copycat ads, parallel thinking, and poorly conceived homages of 2009. Coke, Toyota, and DirecTV-we’re looking at you.

Father’s Day, By the Numbers, page 124
Adding up a day that honors 66 million dads in the U.S.-and all the dollars they bring to the tie business (Father’s Day is the second-biggest occasion for gift ties, behind Christmas), restaurants (the fifth-most popular dining-out day), and more.

For more of the June 2010 issue of Fast Company, please visit www.fastcompany.com beginning May 26.

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Media Contact:
Jocelyn Hawkes
media@fastcompany.com
212-389-5435

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