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  • 08.07.11

Wisdom vs. Knowledge Revisited

Since my original post about wisdom vs. knowledge, I continue to discover that learning really is more than just gathering information. Learning is integrating that knowledge in some way to grow, shift, evolve and respond. We can memorize everything we read and store it for future reference, however if it sits there and isn’t used, did we learn or just memorize? Are we wise if we share what we memorized or are we if we synthesize and contextualize it?

Since my original post about wisdom vs. knowledge, I continue to discover that learning really is more than just gathering information. Learning is integrating that knowledge in some way to grow, shift, evolve and respond. We can memorize everything we read and store it for future reference, however if it sits there and isn’t used, did we learn or just memorize? Are we wise if we share what we memorized or are we if we synthesize and contextualize it?

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Who do I consider wise? One who continually looks at the status quo and sees whether or not things can be better. People who know they don’t know everything about any one thing. And one who continually asks the important questions around what can be better and how can we be the best for the world rather than the best in the world?

In these filled up days where so much information is readily available, the world is fast become an even playing field. There is way too much information bombarding us at the speed of light.We can look for guidance from those who have a wealth of wisdom because they see context, relevance and impact. Wisdom is priceless.

Do you consider yourself wise or knowledgeable?

I know many people with post graduate degrees who can’t find a job. Why? Because they’re scholastically overqualified but don’t have the savvy, the perception and perspectives needed in a fast paced, competitive world. They get lost in their knowledge and get stuck on research but don’t integrate it and use it as needed to move themselves and organizations forward. They consider facts and forget people.

When I chose my research and development team I didn’t look at their degrees as much as experience, impact, awareness factor and openness to grow, learn and create. Knowledge can hold you back in the realm of what was already studied and documented. My team looks at possibility. I’m seeing the same trends occur in the corporate world. Who do you think would serve your organization better?

About the author

Donna Karlin CEC, Diplomate IABMCP and founder and principal of A Better Perspective® & The School of Shadow Coaching, has pioneered the specialized practice of Shadow Coaching® with global political, government, business and senior organizational leaders in the public and private sectors. Donna capitalizes on almost 30 years of experience in coaching, consulting and training to help clients and their organizations evolve into their level of excellence.

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