advertisement
advertisement
  • 06.27.11

Penguin Classics App Shakes Up Book Browsing With A Pub Quiz For Lit Lovers

You know how your iPhone is now an essential tool for finding something to eat? Penguin hopes to offer the same help for people wanting something to read.

Penguin Classics–publisher of lit guides, special editions, and classics ranging from The Odyssey to On the Road–is doing for iPhone book browsing what Urbanspoon did for restaurant searching.

advertisement

The Penguin Classics app for iPad and iPhone, the publisher’s complete annotated listing (free in the iTunes store starting Tuesday), lists every Penguin Classics release searchable by author, title, newest releases, essentials, and more. You can search for books about art in the 7th century or check out the list of Pulitzer Prize-winning classics; if you’re using your iPhone, you can even shake your phone like you would Urbanspoon to find something new to read at random.

Penguin releases a printed annotated guide to its special imprint every year, but not many casual readers outside of the deepest-burrowing bookworms and publishing insiders get their hands on it. Those who do grab a copy use it as a literary to-do list, Elda Rotor, Editorial Director of Penguin Classics, tells Fast Company. “We just wanted to be able to provide this to just a general book-lover. If it inspires people to go buy a classic title, we’re really excited about that. If anything, it just also puts in one place a good resource for people that are thinking about books.”

And if you’re the kind that thinks about books, you’ll want to test that brain power with what might be the most entertaining feature ever to be included in a catalog, the Penguin Classics Quiz, which comes in three speeds: five- and 10-minute games and the particularly humbling lightning round.

It’s “high-brow procrastination,” Rotor says. “We were just brainstorming about what classics readers would love, and I think there are these fans with encyclopedic knowledge of whatever classic author they’re crazy about.”

Although right now the only social media functionality is its integration with Facebook, there’s definitely a social aspect to the quiz. “What I really want to see are people posting or tweeting about their scores. And it would be really great to know if people, like high-profile literary folks, how poorly they do on these tests,” she says, laughing. Meanwhile, Penguin has plans to keep the application fresh and updated based on ideas from tech-savvy bibliophiles.

[Image: Flickr user shashish]

About the author

There are many Jenni Millers in the world, but this Jenni Miller is a freelance writer based in New York City, as are numerous others. She has written about film, feminism, music, and various pop culture concerns for BUST, AV Club, Salon, Moviefone, Refinery29, The Cut, GQ.com, Vulture, and an assortment of other outlets online and in print.

More

Video